Month: August 2016

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Navigating Two Worlds: Samson Occom and William Apess

I am always amazed at the similarities between texts in class. I pair texts together for a reason, but it is always satisfying when other similarities and points of discussion arise between paired texts. This happens all of the time, and when I taught Samson Occom (Mohegan) and William Apess (Pequod) last week, new aspects arose that strengthened reading the two authors, separated by … Read More Navigating Two Worlds: Samson Occom and William Apess

David Walker and the Composition Classroom?

For various reasons, I always like to teach David Walker’s Appeal to the Coloured Citizens of the World (1829) in my Early American literature courses. Typically, I do not have students read selections from Walker’s Appeal until later in the semester; however, as I noted in a previous post, I am having students read it at the very beginning of the semester before moving … Read More David Walker and the Composition Classroom?

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Early American Literature Survey Syllabus

Note: Here is the syllabus I am discussing. This semester, I’m teaching an Early American Literature survey course (through 1865). Typically, I have approached this course chronologically, having students read Native American creation stories, Christopher Columbus, William Bradford, and so on, in that order until we reached Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson. However, this semester, I am trying something different. Instead of assigning students … Read More Early American Literature Survey Syllabus

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False Reporting in Jeremy Love’s “Bayou”

As usual, a trip to the library yielded another comic that caught my attention. Unlike Southern Bastards, Jeremy Love’s Bayou (2009) focuses on the fictional town of Charon, MS, in 1933. More directly than the first volume of Southern Bastards, as well, Bayou centers on race relations in the Deep South during the early part of the twentieth century, all the while inserting fantastical … Read More False Reporting in Jeremy Love’s “Bayou”

Getting Students Excited About Early American Literature?, Part 2

If, after the last post, you are still thinking about various ways to connect what students read in Early American literature survey courses to their day-to-day lives, I have a few more examples of contemporary cultural products that either draw inspiration or allude to texts that students would read in these courses. Over the past few years, of course, there have been adaptations of … Read More Getting Students Excited About Early American Literature?, Part 2