Month: October 2017

+

Is Work/Life Balance Achievable in Academia?

For the first few weeks, I would walk into my eight o’clock class to bright faces and smiles from the students seated within the rows. About a month into the semester, and coincidentally around the same time that they had to turn in their first essay, the smiling faces turned to tired and haggled sleep-deprived visages that stared blankly back at me as I … Read More Is Work/Life Balance Achievable in Academia?

+

Representation and Monica Lynne’s Social Activism

Last post, I wrote about T’Challa’s role as a teacher within the community, and today I want to briefly look at Monica Lynne’s movement from an entertainer to to social activist as she begins to work as a social worker. In Avengers #73, Monica’s actions lead T’Challa to take a more active role in fighting everyday segregation and injustice within the community instead of … Read More Representation and Monica Lynne’s Social Activism

+

Representation and The Black Panther as Teacher

A couple of weeks ago, I wrote about Monica Lynne’s first appearance in Avengers #73. During their first encounter, Monica Lynne causes T’Challa to see his role not just as an Avenger but as a social activist as well. Along those lines, the issues that follow, specifically Avengers #77 and #78 illuminate what T’Challa’s and Monica’s roles in the community end up being. T’Challa, … Read More Representation and The Black Panther as Teacher

+

Ernest J. Gaines’ “A Gathering of Old Men” and the Social Construct of Race

If you enjoy what you read here at Interminable Rambling, think about making a contribution on our Patreon page.  Recently, I spoke with a colleague’s class about Ernest J. Gaines and specifically A Gathering of Old Men (1983). During the question and answer period, two students asked questions that made me start to think about the ways that Gaines, throughout his entire career, challenges … Read More Ernest J. Gaines’ “A Gathering of Old Men” and the Social Construct of Race

+

“Rosa” and The Formation of an American Literature

At first, teaching Rosa, or American Genius and Education (1810) in an early American literature survey course seemed somewhat daunting. I frame my courses around conversations, typically beginning with David Walker and Thomas Jefferson then moving around through time and region back and forth from the colonial to the early nineteenth century. I do this to show students that even though these texts appear … Read More “Rosa” and The Formation of an American Literature