Month: May 2018

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How Did Our Ancestors “Tame” a Continent?

Last week, Donald Trump delivered the commencement address at the Naval Academy. There, he stated that “our ancestors tamed a continent,” and he followed this statement up by adding, “we are not going to apologize for America.” What does this mean? What does it mean to “tame” a continent? What does it mean to be so sure of your achievements that you do not … Read More How Did Our Ancestors “Tame” a Continent?

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Power Manifested in Language

Words, simply put, matter! The lexicon that we use to describe events or refer to individuals carry weight and meaning beyond what we may consider. On this blog, I have written about this topic numerous times, most recently in the post “Our Linguistic Entanglements.” Lately, I’ve still been thinking about this topic, especially when I teach my literature courses. There, I make consciously make … Read More Power Manifested in Language

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Are Colleges Just Vocational Schools?

In my last post, I looked at the opening paragraph of the University of Georgia’s 1785 charter and how it relates to some common threads running through the early republic. Today, I want to take a moment and look at a section from Thomas R. Dew‘s “An Address Delivered before the Students on William and Mary at the Opening of he College, on Monday, … Read More Are Colleges Just Vocational Schools?

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The History of American Higher Ed in UGA’s 1785 Charter

Note: Image is George Cooke’s View of Athens from Carr’s Hill (1845). This summer, I am taking a course on the history of higher education in the United States. For my dissertation, I looked at histories of literary and composition studies in America: Thomas Miller, Nan Johnson, Sharon Crowley, Brian Horner, Shirley Wilson Logan, and more. Since then, I have broadened my scope on … Read More The History of American Higher Ed in UGA’s 1785 Charter

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End of Semester Reflections on Syllabi and “Inclusive Citation”

Continuing the end of the semester reflections, I want to take the time with today’s post to self-reflect on my own practices in regard to constructing syllabi and conducting research. This post arises out of two recent pieces that I have read from Constance Bailey and Maha Bali. Bailey’s piece provides tips for developing and designing your dream course(s), something I have been doing … Read More End of Semester Reflections on Syllabi and “Inclusive Citation”