Month: February 2019

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Language in Ernest Hemingway’s “The Doctor and the Doctor’s Wife”

Writing about the connections between Jean Toomer’s Cane and Ernest Hemingway’s In Our Time, Margaret Wright-Cleveland argues that both texts examine social constructions of race. Specifically, she notes that Hemingway’s text “makes clear that both whiteness and blackness are racial constructions.” As such, both Toomer and Hemingway position “race as a formative idea for American modernism.” Today, I want to look at the ways … Read More Language in Ernest Hemingway’s “The Doctor and the Doctor’s Wife”

My Trip to York Minster

While in York, I just had to visit the York Minster, the largest gothic cathedral in Northern Europe. Today, I want to write some about my visit to the Minster, relaying some of the information that I have learned and sharing some of the pictures that I have taken of it. Like my post on the Brontë Parsonage, this will not be a comprehensive … Read More My Trip to York Minster

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My Trip to the Brontë Parsonage

Yesterday, I went to Haworth and visited the Brontë parsonage. Before the visit, I started reading Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights; however, I have not had the chance to finish it. From what I’ve read, the first volume and about four chapters of the second, I thoroughly enjoy it, especially the academic discussions about Heathcliff’s ancestry. I plan to do a blog post post on … Read More My Trip to the Brontë Parsonage

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“Everything would be the same–as it always was.”

In last Thursday’s post, I wrote about the image of dirt in Lillian E. Smith’s Strange Fruit (1944). Today, I want to continue looking at Smith’s novel. Instead of focusing on Tracy Dean as I did in the last post, I want to take a moment and examine the ways that Nonnie and Bess Anderson, along with Dessie, react to what occurs in the … Read More “Everything would be the same–as it always was.”

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Dirt in Lillian E. Smith’s “Strange Fruit”

Lillian E. Smith’s Strange Fruit (1944) has been on my shelf for a few years now. Right now, it sits back in the United States, untouched and locked away in a box in a storage room. When I purchased it, at a book sale, it was one of those books that I had heard about and that looked relevant to my research. I bought … Read More Dirt in Lillian E. Smith’s “Strange Fruit”