Month: March 2019

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Confronting Selective Memory in Jérémie Dres’ “We Won’t See Auschwitz”

As a literature scholar, I see the links between the past, present, and future as inextricably linked together. Jérémie Dres‘ autobiographical graphic novelWe Won’t See Auschwitz (2011) highlights these linkages in a concrete manner as it chronicles Jérémie and his brother Martin’s trip to Poland to trace their family’s roots before the Holocaust. As the title suggests, the brothers do not go to Auschwitz. … Read More Confronting Selective Memory in Jérémie Dres’ “We Won’t See Auschwitz”

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Why does history matter?

Visiting one of the museums here in Bergen, I walked through the rooms of Edvard Munch’s work, stopping in front of Ungdom (Youth). Ungdom is a large portrait of a boy with a multicolored background behind him that looks, in many ways, like waves. As I started at the portrait, I walked closer and peered at the background near the boy’s right arm and … Read More Why does history matter?

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I’m the Victim of America’s Sin. I’m What Sin Is.

Over the last couple of posts, I have written about Jeff Nichols’ Loving and the legal constructions of race. Today, I want to conclude that discussion by looking some at Jean Toomer’s Cane (1923) and Ernest J. Gaines’ The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman (1971). In each of these texts, published close to fifty years apart, Toomer and Gaines highlight the ways that words … Read More I’m the Victim of America’s Sin. I’m What Sin Is.

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“Made in America”: History and Jeff Nichols’ “Loving”

Last Thursday, I wrote about children and home in Jeff Nichols’ Loving (2016). Today, I want to continue that conversation by focusing on one image from the film. Unfortunately, I do not have a picture of the scene because I could screen capture it. However, I will describe the pertinent parts of it below.

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Children and Home in Jeff Nichols’ “Loving”

Recently, I had the opportunity to speak at the Universités de Tours on Loving v Virginia (1967) in relation Ernest J. Gaines’ Of Love and Dust (1967) and Frank Yerby’s Speak Now (1969). Before my lecture, we watched Jeff Nichols’ Loving (2016). This was the second time I had seen the movie in about a two-week period, so I was intently focused on various … Read More Children and Home in Jeff Nichols’ “Loving”