I started Interminable Rambling in August 2015. On this site, I provide reflections on African American, American, and Southern Literature, American popular culture and politics, and pedagogy. Interminable Rambling arose out of the blog I maintained for the Ernest J Gaines Center. There, I wrote about items in the center’s archives, Gaines’ works, and texts that related to Gaines and Louisiana. When I moved on from the center, I started Interminable Rambling as a way to maintain a writing schedule.

Latest Posts

The Illusion of Whiteness in Atlanta’s “Three Slaps”

Recently, we’ve been reading and discussing Greg Anderson Elysée’s Is’Nana The Were-Spider in my “Monsters, Race, and Comics” course. Over the course of the semester so far, I have referenced “Three Slaps,” the first episode of Atlanta season 3. I’ve referred to this episode specifically because it, and the series as a whole, addresses a myriad of concepts and … Read More The Illusion of Whiteness in Atlanta’s “Three Slaps”

The Importance of Stories in Greg Anderson Elysée’s “Is’Nana The Were Spider”

Every semester, I include a few texts on my syllabus that I have never read, so I get to encounter the texts for the first time alongside my students. For my “Monsters, Race, and Comics” class, someone (I apologize but I forgot who) suggested that check out Greg Anderson Elysée’s Is’Nana The Were-Spider. I read a description of … Read More The Importance of Stories in Greg Anderson Elysée’s “Is’Nana The Were Spider”

Silence and the Reclamation of Voice in Rebecca Hall and Hugo Martínez’s “Wake”

Looking through historical documents, specifically British court documents, related to the 1712 slave revolt in New York, Rebecca Hall encounters the names of four women involved in the revolt. However, their testimony doesn’t exist within the record. Instead, it simply reads, in reference to one of the women, “Having nothing to say for herself than … Read More Silence and the Reclamation of Voice in Rebecca Hall and Hugo Martínez’s “Wake”

“Racially Inflicted Language” and the Archives

In Playing in the Dark, Toni Morrison highlights the ways that language obfuscates yet also illuminates he Africanist presence at the heart of American literature. Morrison delivered the lectures that would constitute Playing in the Dark in 1990, and she foresaw possible backlash from her ideas. She chose to risk backlash because the point she sought to make … Read More “Racially Inflicted Language” and the Archives

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