Category: milestone media

#lukecagesyllabus

As I sat down to write my recent posts on Buck Wild in Milestone Comics` Icon, I did not imagine that it would take four posts to discuss a character that appears in maybe four-five issues. Even with those posts, I did not get a chance to cover every aspect of the character. What arose, though, was an interest in a broader discussion around … Read More #lukecagesyllabus

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The Death of Buck Wild

Over the past few posts, I have explored Buck Wild in Dwayne McDuffie and MD Bright’s Icon. Today, I want to conclude that discussion by looking at Icon #30, the one with Buck Wild’s funeral. In many ways, Icon #30 sums up the discussions on the history of representation of Black superheroes that Buck Wild critiques. The entire issue takes place at Buck Wild’s … Read More The Death of Buck Wild

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Buck Wild, the New Icon!

After his initial appearance in Icon #13, some fans asked whether or not Buck Wild would receive his own series. Others asked that the Milestone team update his speech and clothes to fit the 1990s. Ken Harris wrote in stating that “ICON #13 was absolutely ‘Power’-ful! NEVER has a comic make [sic] me laugh so hard. . . . it was truly comical. I … Read More Buck Wild, the New Icon!

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“There’s this old, played-out record”: Buck Wild and the History of Representation

Today, I want to continue the discussion I began in the last post on Buck Wild in Milestone Comics’ Icon. Specifically, I want to look at the ways that Dwyane McDuffie uses Buck Wild as a metonym and commentary on Black comic book characters that appeared in the 1970s. To do this, I am going to focus on Buck Wild’s initial appearance in Icon … Read More “There’s this old, played-out record”: Buck Wild and the History of Representation

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“All you got to do is do it”: Todd Loomis and Icon

Last Thursday, I wrote about Milestone Comic’s Icon and representation. Today, I want to continue that discussion by focusing on Icon #11, “What I did on my vacation.” Throughout Icon, discussions of representation, specifically within comic books and popular media constantly appear. Icon #11 directly focuses on this by having a 4th grader, Todd Loomis, narrate the issue.