Category: marvel

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Absolution in “Truth: Red, White, and Black”

A few weeks ago, I taught Robert Morales and Kyle Baker’s Truth: Red, White, and Black. While I had read Truth before, and written about it some, teaching it opened up new ways for me to approach the text. In the blog post I wrote about Truth two years ago, I focused on the ways that Morales and Baker “give voice to those whose … Read More Absolution in “Truth: Red, White, and Black”

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Volcana and Reader Fantasies in Marvel’s “Secret Wars”

Over the past couple of posts, I have focused on the depiction of women in Marvel’s crossover Secret Wars. Today, I want to wrap up that discussion by briefly looking at the relationship between Volcana (Marsha Rosenberg) and Molecule Man (Owen Reece.) As I have noted before, I could also dive into examinations of relationships between the Enchantress and Thor or between Titana and … Read More Volcana and Reader Fantasies in Marvel’s “Secret Wars”

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Zsaji and Reader Fantasies in Marvel’s “Secret Wars”

In my first post on Marvel’s Secret Wars, I discussed the ways that the representations of Janet Van Dyne and Ororo Munroe each played into both gendered and racial stereotypes. Today, I want to expand some on the ways that Secret Wars, through the some of the relationships in the series, plays into young, white male readers’ romance fantasies. This comes up in two … Read More Zsaji and Reader Fantasies in Marvel’s “Secret Wars”

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Representation in Marvel’s “Secret Wars”

A few weeks back, I picked up Marvel’s Secret Wars. This crossover event took place over the course of twelve issues from May 1984 through April 1985. I picked up Secret Wars because it looked interesting, and I remember having issue #8, the first appearance of the Symbiote, when I was younger. Fans have been clamoring for Secret Wars on the big screen, and … Read More Representation in Marvel’s “Secret Wars”

#lukecagesyllabus

As I sat down to write my recent posts on Buck Wild in Milestone Comics` Icon, I did not imagine that it would take four posts to discuss a character that appears in maybe four-five issues. Even with those posts, I did not get a chance to cover every aspect of the character. What arose, though, was an interest in a broader discussion around … Read More #lukecagesyllabus

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Buck Wild, the New Icon!

After his initial appearance in Icon #13, some fans asked whether or not Buck Wild would receive his own series. Others asked that the Milestone team update his speech and clothes to fit the 1990s. Ken Harris wrote in stating that “ICON #13 was absolutely ‘Power’-ful! NEVER has a comic make [sic] me laugh so hard. . . . it was truly comical. I … Read More Buck Wild, the New Icon!

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The Avengers and Interracial Intimacy: Part 2

If you enjoy what you read here at Interminable Rambling, think about making a contribution on our Patreon page.  Last post, I started talking about the relationship between Wanda Maximoff (Scarlet Witch) and the Vision as a metaphor for interracial intimacy during the early 1970s, only five years removed from the Supreme Court decision in Loving v. Virginia. Today, I want to finish up … Read More The Avengers and Interracial Intimacy: Part 2

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The Avengers and Interracial Intimacy: Part 1

If you enjoy what you read here at Interminable Rambling, think about making a contribution on our Patreon page.  I started reading a few issues of Avengers recently, specifically some written by Steve Englehart. Amid all of the superhero action and fighting, there is a commentary on interracial intimacy within the relationship between Wanda Maximoff (Scarlet Witch) and Vision (an android). Their relationship begins … Read More The Avengers and Interracial Intimacy: Part 1

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Historical Context in “X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills”

If you enjoy what you read here at Interminable Rambling, think about making a contribution on our Patreon page.  Last post, I wrote about the rhetoric of fear that William Stryker espouses in Chris Claremont and Brent Eric Anderson’s X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills (1982) graphic novel. Today, I want to expand, some, upon that discussion and look at a couple of pivotal scenes … Read More Historical Context in “X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills”

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The Continued Importance of “X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills”

Recently, someone suggested I take a look at Chris Claremont and Brent Eric Anderson’s X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills (1982). After reading, I came away noting the number of similarities between the 36 year old graphic novel and the present moment. In an interview on the 35th anniversary of its publication, Claremont and Anderson, along with interviewer Alex Abad-Santos, talk about the correlations between … Read More The Continued Importance of “X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills”

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Noah Burstein, Paternalism, and Black Bodies in David F. Walker´s “Luke Cage”

After reading David Walker’s Nighthawk, I started reading his run on Luke Cage that started in May 2017. The first story arc, “Sins of  the Father,” sees Cage headed to New Orleans to attend the funeral of Dr. Noah Burstein, the man who experimented on Carl Lucas at Seagate prison, turning him into the superhero Luke Cage. Once he arrives, Cage discovers a plot … Read More Noah Burstein, Paternalism, and Black Bodies in David F. Walker´s “Luke Cage”

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We Must Listen, See, and Act: David F. Walker’s “Nighthawk”

Last post, I wrote about the ways that David F. Walker’s Nighthawk lays bare the tendrils of racism that work at various levels to suffocate and oppress people of color in America. Today, I want to expand some on this and look at how Raymond Kane confronts issues of racism and subjugation. I want to explore, briefly, the moral tensions that Kane encounters as … Read More We Must Listen, See, and Act: David F. Walker’s “Nighthawk”