Category: Uncategorized

+

The Master Race? Xenophobia and Racism in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby

This post originally appeared over at Pedagogy and American Literary Studies on November 19, 2018.  During a public meeting on November 13, 2018, a white county commissioner in Leavenworth County Kansas told Triveece Penelton, a Black city planner, “I don’t want you to think I’m picking on you, because, we’re part of the master race…You know you got a gap in your teeth, we’re the masters, … Read More The Master Race? Xenophobia and Racism in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby

+

Laurel Falls Camp at 100

Note: This article originally appeared in the Spring 2020 issue of “A View from the Mountain,” the Lillian E. Smith Center’s newsletter. This year marks the 100th anniversary of Laurel Falls Camp. Lillian Smith’s father, Calvin, opened the camp in 1920, and it was the first private camp for girls in the state of Georgia. “Miss Lil,” as the campers called her, took over … Read More Laurel Falls Camp at 100

+

Lillian E. Smith Graphic Memoir

In my last post, I wrote about the graphic memoir project that I assigned this semester in my Literature and Composition Graphic Memoir class. As well, I talked about making my own graphic memoir alongside my students, and I shared a brief three page sequence from the project. Today, I want to share with you my finished project and my artist statement, a brief … Read More Lillian E. Smith Graphic Memoir

The Psychological Cell in Max Brooks and Caanan White’s “The Harlem Hellfighters”

Max Brooks and Caanan White’s The Harlem Hellfighters tells a fictionalized story on the 369th Infantry Regiment during World War I. The 369th was an African American regiment, and the Germans dubbed them the Harlem Hellfighters. Brooks and White’s graphic novel highlights the discrimination against African American soldiers both and home and abroad, and it highlights their heroism during the war. For this post, … Read More The Psychological Cell in Max Brooks and Caanan White’s “The Harlem Hellfighters”

+

Kamala Khan or Ms. Marvel? Identity in “Ms. Marvel: No Normal”

Ever since I first read G. Willow Wilson and Adrian Alphona’s Ms. Marvel, I knew that I wanted to teach it in one of my courses. This semester, I finally had the chance to teach volume 1, “No Normal,” in my Multicultural American Literature class. Today, I want to write some about Ms. Marvel, specifically looking at the ways that Kamala Khan grapples with … Read More Kamala Khan or Ms. Marvel? Identity in “Ms. Marvel: No Normal”

Multicultural American Literature Syllabus

This semester, I am teaching “Multicultural American Literature.” Today, I want to share my syllabus and my thoughts while creating it. To begin with, I wanted this course to look at multiple time periods, not just something like a twenty-five to fifty year span. As such, there are texts from the late eighteenth century all the way up to the twenty-first. Along with this, … Read More Multicultural American Literature Syllabus

+

Interracial Intimacy in Ernest Gaines’ “Bloodline”

As I read Ernest Gaines’ “Bloodline” recently, the interactions between ‘Malia and Frank Laurent stood out. The story, essentially, centers around Copper, the son of Frank’s brother Walter who raped Copper’s mother. Copper has returned to the Laurent plantation to claim what is his, by birth. Essentially, he arrives to overthrow the system that denies him an existence due to the fact that his … Read More Interracial Intimacy in Ernest Gaines’ “Bloodline”

+

The Continued Importance of “X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills”

Recently, someone suggested I take a look at Chris Claremont and Brent Eric Anderson’s X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills (1982). After reading, I came away noting the number of similarities between the 36 year old graphic novel and the present moment. In an interview on the 35th anniversary of its publication, Claremont and Anderson, along with interviewer Alex Abad-Santos, talk about the correlations between … Read More The Continued Importance of “X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills”

+

End of Semester Reflections on Syllabi and “Inclusive Citation”

Continuing the end of the semester reflections, I want to take the time with today’s post to self-reflect on my own practices in regard to constructing syllabi and conducting research. This post arises out of two recent pieces that I have read from Constance Bailey and Maha Bali. Bailey’s piece provides tips for developing and designing your dream course(s), something I have been doing … Read More End of Semester Reflections on Syllabi and “Inclusive Citation”

+

Identity in Childish Gambino’s “This is America”

A few days ago, Childish Gambino’s “This is America” dropped. Since then, people have been talking about the song and the video, either praising or questioning Gambino and Hiro Muria’s message and delivery. Initially, I landed on the side of utter praise for the song and the video. I’ve been a fan of Donald Glover since Community and of his music since Camp. With … Read More Identity in Childish Gambino’s “This is America”

Getting Ready for Next Year in Norway

As I get ready to head to the University of Bergen in August, I have started to think about ways to discuss issues of race in America’s history. Brianne Jaquette’s piece, “Fulbright Workshop: Black Lives Matter, Part One,” sparked these thoughts, and her discussions about how Europeans talk about race differently than we do here in America. This is important for me to consider, … Read More Getting Ready for Next Year in Norway

+

What to Expect in 2018!

Welcome to 2018! Back in August 2015, I started Interminable Rambling as a space for me to flesh out thoughts I had concerning texts I was reading, pedagogy, and culture. Since that first post, I have published 236 posts for this site on a myriad of topics such as Mary Rowlandson and Sarah Kemble Knight to Star Wars: The Force Awakens and court cases such … Read More What to Expect in 2018!