Category: Uncategorized

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“Monsters, Race, and Comics” Syllabus

Over the past few weeks, I’ve been thinking about the theme of my fall course. Initially, I wanted to do a course on “neo-slave” narratives, interrogating that term and looking at texts such as Robert Jones, Jr.’s The Prophets, Toni Morrison’s Beloved, Octavia Butler’s Kindred, and more. While I still want to teach this course, my focus started to shift the more I thought … Read More “Monsters, Race, and Comics” Syllabus

Constructed Narratives in Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips’ “Pulp”

A few years ago I came across Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips’ Criminal: The Last of the Innocent. The ways that Brubaker and Phillips use the medium of comics to examine the ways that nostalgia influences the ways that we perceive the world really stood out to me as I read through the series. Recently, I picked up their latest release, Pulp, and as … Read More Constructed Narratives in Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips’ “Pulp”

The Importance of Language: Terrorism and January 6, 2021

Jonte’ Taylor wrote “Darkness Fall, USA” years ago, and it recently appeared in the Down Yonder ‘Zine. During the Zoom event where Taylor read and spoke about the piece, he noted its continued relevance, especially within the past year. He talked about changing some lines here and there to bring it to 2021, and one of the lines that he changed struck me because … Read More The Importance of Language: Terrorism and January 6, 2021

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The Master Race? Xenophobia and Racism in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby

This post originally appeared over at Pedagogy and American Literary Studies on November 19, 2018.  During a public meeting on November 13, 2018, a white county commissioner in Leavenworth County Kansas told Triveece Penelton, a Black city planner, “I don’t want you to think I’m picking on you, because, we’re part of the master race…You know you got a gap in your teeth, we’re the masters, … Read More The Master Race? Xenophobia and Racism in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby

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Laurel Falls Camp at 100

Note: This article originally appeared in the Spring 2020 issue of “A View from the Mountain,” the Lillian E. Smith Center’s newsletter. This year marks the 100th anniversary of Laurel Falls Camp. Lillian Smith’s father, Calvin, opened the camp in 1920, and it was the first private camp for girls in the state of Georgia. “Miss Lil,” as the campers called her, took over … Read More Laurel Falls Camp at 100