Category: history

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History as “an open book, up under the sky”: Part II

When Charlayne Hunter and Hamilton Holmes enrolled in classes at UGA in 1961, the walked past the arch, steps away from the UGA marker that claims most of the students went to fight during “the War for Southern Independence.” Hunter and Holmes were the first African American students admitted to UGA, 7 years after Brown v. Board and 11 years after McLaurin v. Oklahoma … Read More History as “an open book, up under the sky”: Part II

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History as “an open book, up under the sky”: Part I

Speaking with Clint Smith, Dr. Ibrahima Seck, the director of research at the Whitney Plantation, talks about the importance of education and of sites such as the Whitney. Seck told Smith, “The problem with [this] country–and also all around the world—is . . . miseducation. The miseducation of the mind and hidden history.” The role of education in the dissemination of information and in … Read More History as “an open book, up under the sky”: Part I

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Retrieving History in Rebecca Hall and Hugo Martínez’s “Wake”

Over the last couple of posts, I’ve been looking at Rebecca Hall and Hugo Martínez’s Wake: The Hidden History of Women-Led Slave Revolts. Today, I want to conclude this series by looking at some of the panels in the last chapter of Wake. Entitled “Ancestry in Progress,” the final chapter brings together the threads that Hall and Martínez weave throughout the text, and as I have discussed previously, … Read More Retrieving History in Rebecca Hall and Hugo Martínez’s “Wake”

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Layouts in Rebecca Hall and Hugo Martínez’s “Wake”

Last post, I wrote about the ways that Rebecca Hall and Hugo Martínez’s Wake: The Hidden History of Women-Led Slave Revolts uses the juxtaposition of text and image to highlight the continued ways that past impacts the present. Today, I want to continue that discussion and expand it some by focusing specifically on some of Martínez’s layouts. From the opening of Wake to its … Read More Layouts in Rebecca Hall and Hugo Martínez’s “Wake”

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The Ground Beneath Our Feet in Rebecca Hall and Hugo Martínez’s “Wake”

On a recent trip to Savannah, GA, I walked around the downtown area and visited sites such as Wormsloe, a plantation established by Noble Jones in 1736. At Wormsloe, which is a Georgia State Park, none of the materials, from the brochures to the museum to the markers around the site mentioned the enslaved who made money for Noble and his offspring. In the … Read More The Ground Beneath Our Feet in Rebecca Hall and Hugo Martínez’s “Wake”