Category: lillian e smith

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Jacob Lawrence’s “The Ordeal of Alice”

During her presentation at “The Civil Rights Movement in Northeast Georgia” professional development workshop, Marie Cochran introduced the participants to ways to incorporate visual images into their classrooms. She had them read Dianna Minor’s NCTE post, “Visual Literacy is Critical for 21st Century Learners,” and had them look at two images using the OPTIC strategy. Today, I want to look at one of the … Read More Jacob Lawrence’s “The Ordeal of Alice”

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Chester Himes “Democracy is for the Unafraid”

Chester Himes wrote his 1945 novel, If He Hollers Let Him Go, while living in the home of Mary Oyama Mittwer, a Japanese American author who, along with her family, was incarcerated at Heart Mountain in Wyoming then relocated to Denver in 1943. In 1944, Himes wrote “Democracy is for the Unafraid,” which appeared in Common Ground. Himes saw Japanese incarceration firsthand, and he … Read More Chester Himes “Democracy is for the Unafraid”

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Reflecting on the LES Center’s Professional Development Program

This past week, the Lillian E. Smith (LES) Center hosted “The Civil Rights Movement in Northeast Georgia,” an inaugural professional development opportunity for P-12 educators throughout Georgia and the surrounding states. I’ve had a couple of days to reflect on the program, and today I want to share some of my thoughts. This will not be a detailed discussion of what the participants did; … Read More Reflecting on the LES Center’s Professional Development Program

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We Must Not Remain Silent: Lillian Smith’s “Address to White Liberals”

Whenever I go to the Lillian E. Smith Center, I take time to look around, and inevitably, I always find something new that I’ve somehow missed in my previous trips. Usually, scan the numerous books that Smith has in her library, her bedroom, and elsewhere. During a recent trip, I picked up Bucklin Moon’s Primer for White Folks (1945), a book I’d picked up … Read More We Must Not Remain Silent: Lillian Smith’s “Address to White Liberals”

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The Artist and Self-Reflection: James Baldwin and Lillian Smith

On a recent episode of “Dope with Lime,” I spoke with Michael Bibler about a recent course he taught, “Baldwin’s Queer South.” We spoke about a lot of things, but one thing that got me thinking was the role of art and the artist in the world. He mentioned James Baldwin’s “The Creative Process,” and after our discussion, I went to read Baldwin’s 1962 … Read More The Artist and Self-Reflection: James Baldwin and Lillian Smith