Category: lillian e smith

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History, Comics, and the Civil Rights Movement

This semester, I am teaching two Civil Rights era memoirs: Lila Quintero Weaver’s Darkroom: A Memoir in Black and White and John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, and Nate Powell’s March Trilogy. I thoroughly enjoy these texts, and I enjoy teaching them. However, as I reread them, I keep thinking about what the texts don’t cover. I understand that each of these works are focused on … Read More History, Comics, and the Civil Rights Movement

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Reflections on Lil

As the date approached to unveil the historical marker honoring the life, work, and legacy of Lillian E. Smith I kept stressing over how many people would attend the event. I didn’t think, at any point, about how I’d actually feel during the ceremony itself. However, when the ceremony began on that cloudless spring day, with the birds singing in the trees and the … Read More Reflections on Lil

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Keri Leigh Merritt “History Marker Honoring Lillian Smith”

Yesterday, the Lillian E. Smith Center unveiled a historical marker honoring Smith’s life. work, and legacy. I am still process this event and its impact because as the program commenced and went on, I found myself becoming overwhelmed with emotions, and I am still, right now, processing those thoughts. I plan to write about the ceremony in an upcoming post. Today, though, I want … Read More Keri Leigh Merritt “History Marker Honoring Lillian Smith”

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Professional Development Opportunity “The Civil Rights Movement in Northeast Georgia”

When I worked at the Ernest J. Gaines Center at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, one of the programs that I wanted to implement was an annual professional development opportunity for area educators, providing them a space to learn about Gaines’ work and the history and people that informed it, looking at how all of it shaped the community and region in which we lived … Read More Professional Development Opportunity “The Civil Rights Movement in Northeast Georgia”

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The Heart or the Pen?

During the LES Studies course this semester, we have started talking about whether or not Lillian Smith deals with class in her examinations of the psychological effects of racism. We have talked about Smith’s commentary on the wedges that wealthy whites, those in power, drive between individuals beneath them and the ways that these wedges, coupled with the rhetoric of demagogues, serves to sustain … Read More The Heart or the Pen?