Category: lillian e smith

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Severed History in Nate Powell’s “Save it For Later” Part II

In last Thursday’s post, I started looking at “Good Trouble, Bad Flags” in Nate Powell’s Save It For Later: Promises, Parenthood, and the Urgency of Protest. Specifically, I looked at the ways that Powell discusses the severing of history and the erasure of history that occurs throughout our collective consciousness. Today, I want to continue that discussion by looking at a few more moments … Read More Severed History in Nate Powell’s “Save it For Later” Part II

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Severed History in Nate Powell’s “Save it For Later” Part I

Nate Powell’s Save It For Later is a book for this moment. As a parent, as a white male Southerner, Powell’s book speaks to me in the same ways that Lillian Smith’s words speak to me across the decades. Both Powell and Smith know the intertangled webs that maintain systems of racism and oppression. Both Powell and Smith recognize their positions within those webs, … Read More Severed History in Nate Powell’s “Save it For Later” Part I

Reaching Our Whole Self

If you have read my blog over the last couple of years, you know I have been thinking a lot about whether or not we can truly know ourselves. At the core of this inquiry is whether or not we can ever disentangle ourselves from all of the cultural, familial, and other influences that pour themselves into us on a daily basis. These factors … Read More Reaching Our Whole Self

Collaboration of the Dream

In October 2019, the Lillian E. Smith Center hosted “Celebrating Lillian Smith,” a symposium commemorating the 75th anniversary of Strange Fruit. Last October, we hosted “Untangling Whiteness: Reflection and Action,” a virtual conference that explored the constructions of whiteness and ways for us to works towards a more equitable society for all. This coming Thursday, March 4, the Lillian E. Smith Center will host … Read More Collaboration of the Dream

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Same Wolf, Different Clothes: White Evangelicals and Critical Race Theory

Note: This post originally appeared on Arc Digital on November 20, 2020. On August 18, 1963, 10 days before Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his famous “I Have A Dream” speech at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, an article entitled “Our Laws Must Be Upheld” appeared in The Shreveport Times. The author derided the “Negro rights” revolution, writing that there has been “increasing … Read More Same Wolf, Different Clothes: White Evangelicals and Critical Race Theory