Category: fascism

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2022 Year in Roundup: Part I

Interminable Rambling has been around, in various forms, since 2015. Over the course of these seven years, I’ve published about 715 posts, around 1,000 words per post. That means, I’ve written over 715,000 words during that period. That is hard for me to fathom. At the end of the year, I typically either do a most read posts roundup or a roundup of some of … Read More 2022 Year in Roundup: Part I

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Why we “read books”

During our trip to Washington D.C. a few weeks ago, I picked up a copy of Timothy Snyder and Nora Krug’s On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century. The book is part history book, as the “lessons from the twentieth century” indicates, a part guide to how to work to preserve democracy when confronted with fascism or totalitarianism. Multiple things stand out to … Read More Why we “read books”

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The Dangers of Preaching the Persecution of Christians in the United States Continued

In my last post, I wrote about the dangers of preaching persecution in the United States. Since writing that post, I finished Candida Moss’ The Myth of Persecution: How Early Christians Invented a Story of Martydom and read Jason Stanley’s How Fascism Works: The Politics of Us and Them. Each of these books have helped, in different ways, me with thinking about the harm … Read More The Dangers of Preaching the Persecution of Christians in the United States Continued

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The Quotidian in Art Spiegelman’s “Maus”: Part I

Even though the study travel trip I and a colleague planned this semester for Poland will not happen, I’m continuing to read and learn more about World War II and the Holocaust specifically. Part of this process has been teaching works such as Cynthia Ozick’s The Messiah of Stockholm and Art Spiegelman’s Maus in my Multicultural American Literature course. Along with this, I have … Read More The Quotidian in Art Spiegelman’s “Maus”: Part I

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Fascism and the Ku Klux Klan in Bill Campbell and Bizhan Khobabandeh’s “The Day the Klan Came to Town”

As I reread Bill Campbell and Bizhan Khobabandeh’s The Day the Klan Came to Town (2021) recently, my mind kept coming back to another book I have been reading at the moment, Robert O. Paxton’s The Anatomy of Fascism (2005). Campbell and Khodabandeh’s graphic novel tells the story of individuals in Carnegie, PA, standing up against the Ku Klux Klan’s planned march through the borough of Pittsburgh where Jews … Read More Fascism and the Ku Klux Klan in Bill Campbell and Bizhan Khobabandeh’s “The Day the Klan Came to Town”