Category: syllabus

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500th Post: David F. Walker Syllabus

For a while I have been thinking about a syllabus based on the work of David F. Walker. Recently, I was spurred on to work up a tentative syllabus through a discussion online, and as such, this is what I present to you today. This syllabus is in not way complete. However, it is meant to serve as an introduction to the ways to … Read More 500th Post: David F. Walker Syllabus

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Ethnic American Literature Syllabus

Every semester, I post my syllabi here. This fall semester the class may look a little different, but the main goals remain. I’m teaching an ethnic American literature class this fall, and the texts that I have chosen to teach this semester come, as usual, from partly my own desire to expand my own knowledge and understanding of different ethnicities, nationalities, and cultures. As … Read More Ethnic American Literature Syllabus

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“African American Literature and the American West” Syllabus

The photo above is of the head of Canyon de Chelly by Timothy O’Sullivan.  For my dissertation, I explored the connections between the ways that African American, Native American, and white women authors used Scottish Enlightenment rhetoric to argue for their positions within the body politic of the United States. One of the key aspects that arose from the dissertation was the ways that African American and … Read More “African American Literature and the American West” Syllabus

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What to Expect in 2019!

Welcome back! As you know, I started Interminable Rambling way back in August 2015. That means that this year will mark the fourth anniversary of this site. I started this site over at Blogspot where I wrote 81 posts before migrating over to WordPress. Since that August 2015, both sites have received 99,269 views. This past year alone, the WordPress site received 40,854 views. … Read More What to Expect in 2019!

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“The Prince of Pulpsters” or “Debunker of Myths”: Frank Yerby Syllabus

When reading Frank Yerby’s work, I keep asking one question over and over again: “Why isn’t anyone teaching these texts?” I know that some scholars teach Yerby; however, compared to other authors, his appearance in the classroom is minuscule. I had heard the name, in passing, during my graduate work; however, I never saw him in any anthologies or read any of his books … Read More “The Prince of Pulpsters” or “Debunker of Myths”: Frank Yerby Syllabus

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“Introduction to Modernism: Modernism and Ernest J. Gaines” Syllabus

As part of my Fulbright application, I proposed two courses for my time at the University of Bergen. I have already posted one of these syallbi, “African American Literature and the American South.” This course will be an MA level course, and I am currently in the process of finalizing the readings. They have changed, some, since I initially posted the syllabus. When I … Read More “Introduction to Modernism: Modernism and Ernest J. Gaines” Syllabus

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End of Semester Reflections on Syllabi and “Inclusive Citation”

Continuing the end of the semester reflections, I want to take the time with today’s post to self-reflect on my own practices in regard to constructing syllabi and conducting research. This post arises out of two recent pieces that I have read from Constance Bailey and Maha Bali. Bailey’s piece provides tips for developing and designing your dream course(s), something I have been doing … Read More End of Semester Reflections on Syllabi and “Inclusive Citation”

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“African American Literature and the American South” Syllabus

Occasionally, I post syllabi ideas here on the blog. Today, I want to share a syllabus I have been thinking about recently entitled “African American Literature and the American South.” The South, as a geographic and imaginary space, looms large in the works of not just African American authors but in writers of all ethnic backgrounds from the United States. Maryemma Graham discusses the … Read More “African American Literature and the American South” Syllabus

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African American Literature and the American Dream Syllabus

Whenever I teach an American literature survey course, the topic of the American Dream inevitably comes up. Typically, I ask students to define this mythological term and they reply with the standard answer, “The American Dream means happiness and success.” I elaborate upon this response by pointing them back, first to the Declaration of Independence, then to other texts. The Declaration states that “life, … Read More African American Literature and the American Dream Syllabus

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Early American Literature Survey Syllabus

Note: Here is the syllabus I am discussing. This semester, I’m teaching an Early American Literature survey course (through 1865). Typically, I have approached this course chronologically, having students read Native American creation stories, Christopher Columbus, William Bradford, and so on, in that order until we reached Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson. However, this semester, I am trying something different. Instead of assigning students … Read More Early American Literature Survey Syllabus

"Charles W. Chesnutt and The Race Question at the Turn of the TwentiethCentury" Syllabus

Recently, I just finished reading Charles W. Chesnutt’s “The Future American” (1900) and The Quarry (1928) for a paper I am writing. As I read Chesnutt’s last novel, I started to think about a possible syllabus that would use Chesnutt as a focal point to explore “the race question” at the turn of the twentieth century. I have posted syllabi such as “African American Crime … Read More "Charles W. Chesnutt and The Race Question at the Turn of the TwentiethCentury" Syllabus