Category: nate powell

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Detecting Bullshit in Nate Powell’s “Save It For Later”

While so many aspects of Nate Powell’s Save It For Later stand out and make me stop to think, the one theme that resonates with me the most has to be the ways that our children view the world. “Their bullshit dectors,” as Powell puts in near the end of “Wingnut,” “are much better than ours.” This assertion is what drives me, partly, when … Read More Detecting Bullshit in Nate Powell’s “Save It For Later”

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The Past, Present, and Future in Nate Powell’s “Conjurers”

Last post, I started discussing Nate Powell’s “Conjurers” and the ways that comics provide a unique medium for bringing the past, present, and future together in a singular manner. Today, I want to finish that discussion by looking at the latter half of “Conjurers.” I’ve written about that the ways that comics flattens time, specifically in connecting the past and the present. Powell does … Read More The Past, Present, and Future in Nate Powell’s “Conjurers”

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Connecting Generations in Nate Powell’s “Conjurers”

I’ll always remember sitting at the table in my grandparents house and the smells that would float through the room as my grandmother whipped up food for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. I distinctly remember the salmon cakes and the vegetable soup. However, the one treat that always makes my olfactory nerve and taste buds perk up, sending electric impulses to my brain and triggering … Read More Connecting Generations in Nate Powell’s “Conjurers”

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Severed History in Nate Powell’s “Save It For Later”: Part V

Speaking with Sean Clancy, Nate Powell talked about the ways he views his own activism. He says, “I’m like the vast majority of people. I show up and I use the time and energy from other parts of my life to make up for the fact that I’m less involved on a direct action level. A lot of that means putting my concerns and … Read More Severed History in Nate Powell’s “Save It For Later”: Part V

Severed History in Nate Powell’s “Save It For Later”: Part IV

“Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King, I Have a Dream.” This is the nine-word problem that informs much of our understanding of the Civil Rights Movement. It begins with Rosa Parks in Montgomery in 1955, carries through King during the bus boycotts and into 1963 where he delivered his famous “I Have a Dream Speech” on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial during the March on … Read More Severed History in Nate Powell’s “Save It For Later”: Part IV