Category: nate powell

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Psychological Effects of Racism in “The Silence of Our Friends”

Over the last two posts, I’ve looked at some scenes in Mark Long, Jim Demonakos, and Nate Powell’s The Silence of Our Friends. Today, I want to wrap up that discussion by examining a sequence where Larry takes Danny to Freeport to go crabbing. There are countless other sequences and scenes that I could discuss, but every time I read The Silence of Our … Read More Psychological Effects of Racism in “The Silence of Our Friends”

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Building Bridges in “The Silence of Our Friends”

Mark Long, Jim Demonakos, and Nate Powell’s The Silence of Our Friends opens with Mark playing war in 1968 in Houston, TX. He crawls through the front yard pretending to be an American soldier as he searches for Vietcong soldiers before engaging them. His sister Michelle wants to join him, and Mark gets angry because he doesn’t “wanna play with no girls.” Eventually, after … Read More Building Bridges in “The Silence of Our Friends”

“Our Laws Must Be Upheld”

When I was younger, I used to watch old black and white television shows on Nick at Nite and other channels. After watching the shows, I used to think that people, before the advent of color television or even technicolor, saw only in black and white. I used to think that what they saw through their eyes consisted of only two colors and shades … Read More “Our Laws Must Be Upheld”

“The Silence of Our Friends”: The Past is Not Past

Recently, I reread Mark Long, Jim Demonakos, and Nate Powell’s The Silence of Our Friends, a graphic novel that tells the story of the events at Texas State University in 1967 and 1968, events that would become known as the TSU Riot even though a more apt label, as Black Past puts it, would be a “police riot.” While the novel tells the story … Read More “The Silence of Our Friends”: The Past is Not Past

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Having Students Analyze Comics’ Pages: Part II

Last post, I wrote about some of the pages I passed out to students in my Literature and Composition Graphic Memoirs’ class. I distributed the pages and had students examine them based on Scott McCloud’s discussion of transitions and gutters in Understanding Comics. Today, I want to continue by looking at some more of the pages that I had students examine. Unlike the pages … Read More Having Students Analyze Comics’ Pages: Part II