Category: graphic novels

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Memory Creates Life: Part I

Lillian Smith’s One Hour (1959) is a complex novel that examines a myriad of societal and existential questions from the influence of racism and patriarchy on one’s psyche to the ways we remember and think about death. The novel centers around what Smith calls a “minor plot.” David Landrum, the Episcopal Priest at All Saints Church in the town, narrates the story, writing about the events, … Read More Memory Creates Life: Part I

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Beauty and Love in Charlot Kristensen’s “What We Don’t Talk About”

During my recent trip to Philadelphia, I had to stop by Amalgam Comics & Coffeehouse before they closed on October 15. Thankfully, I had some time to go to Almagam, look around, and pick up a few books. On the recommendation of someone at Almagam, I got Peter Calloway and George Jeanty’s Shadow Doctor. As well, I purchased Canizales Amazona and Charlot Kristensen’s What We Don’t Talk About. I chose these books because … Read More Beauty and Love in Charlot Kristensen’s “What We Don’t Talk About”

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Silence and the Reclamation of Voice in Rebecca Hall and Hugo Martínez’s “Wake”

Looking through historical documents, specifically British court documents, related to the 1712 slave revolt in New York, Rebecca Hall encounters the names of four women involved in the revolt. However, their testimony doesn’t exist within the record. Instead, it simply reads, in reference to one of the women, “Having nothing to say for herself than what she had previously said . . .” The … Read More Silence and the Reclamation of Voice in Rebecca Hall and Hugo Martínez’s “Wake”

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“Racially Inflicted Language” and the Archives

In Playing in the Dark, Toni Morrison highlights the ways that language obfuscates yet also illuminates he Africanist presence at the heart of American literature. Morrison delivered the lectures that would constitute Playing in the Dark in 1990, and she foresaw possible backlash from her ideas. She chose to risk backlash because the point she sought to make was vitally important. As she puts it, “for both … Read More “Racially Inflicted Language” and the Archives

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Thread in Jonathan Fetter-Vorm and Ari Kelman’s “Battle Lines”

Ryan Franklin, one of my colleagues, teaches a Graphic History course every year. For the class, Franklin chooses various graphic novels and memoirs that focus on historical events and individuals to teach students about historiography and research. One of the books he uses is Jonathan Fetter-Vorm and Ari Kelman’s Battle Lines: A Graphic History of the Civil War (2015). When I saw this book … Read More Thread in Jonathan Fetter-Vorm and Ari Kelman’s “Battle Lines”