Category: graphic travelogue

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The Construction of History in Guy Delisle’s “Jerusalem”

“History is written by the victors.” Only a few weeks ago, this aphorism appeared on national television when Attorney General William Barr responded to a question from CBS’s Catherine Herridge about the dismissing of charges against Michael Flynn by asking, “When history looks back on this decision, how do you think it will be written?” Barr answered his own question with the following, “Well … Read More The Construction of History in Guy Delisle’s “Jerusalem”

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Barriers in Guy Delisle’s “Jerusalem: Chronicles from the Holy City”

Connections lead to understanding. Connections lead to a break down in the beliefs and myths that keep us separates. Connection bridge the chasms that exist between us. However, one must be open to these connections. If one is not open, then no matter what connections a person makes, they will always succumb to the myths and fears that reside within one’s brain. In Jerusalem: … Read More Barriers in Guy Delisle’s “Jerusalem: Chronicles from the Holy City”

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Graphic Memoir Project

This semester in my Literature and Composition Graphic Memoirs class I am having students do a creative final project. For this project, they will either create their own graphic memoir or do a “Call and Response” piece for Looking at Appalachia. Since this is a new assignment, I am making my own graphic memoir alongside my students, trying my hand at creating a text. … Read More Graphic Memoir Project

Fences in George Takei’s “They Called Us Enemy”

Some of the strongest symbols within George Takei’s They Called Us Enemy are the fences that surround Rohwer and Tule Lake interment camps. There are multiple panels depicting the barbed wire fences, and various angles occur in each of the panels. These images, coupled with Takei’s words, highlight the psychological effects of xenophobia and racism on individuals, especially children such as Takei. I have … Read More Fences in George Takei’s “They Called Us Enemy”

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Structuring and Rectifying the Past in Jérémie Dres’ “We Won’t See Auschwitz”

This semester, I taught Jérémie Dres’ We Won’t See Auschwitz. I read Dres’ book last year in Norway, after I visited Warsaw, and it made me think about various things, mainly about the ways that we remember and construct the past. This is one of the recurring themes in the books that we are reading this semester, and it is one of the main … Read More Structuring and Rectifying the Past in Jérémie Dres’ “We Won’t See Auschwitz”