Category: holocaust

+

Narrative Construction in Art Spiegelman’s “Maus”

One thing that I really enjoy about graphic memoirs is the metanarrative nature of the medium. When reading a prose autobiography, the author typically does not draw attention to the compositional aspects of the text. For example, with Benjamin Franklin’s autobiography, we know that he writes to his son; however, he does not refer to the writing of the text or the way he … Read More Narrative Construction in Art Spiegelman’s “Maus”

+

Structuring and Rectifying the Past in Jérémie Dres’ “We Won’t See Auschwitz”

This semester, I taught Jérémie Dres’ We Won’t See Auschwitz. I read Dres’ book last year in Norway, after I visited Warsaw, and it made me think about various things, mainly about the ways that we remember and construct the past. This is one of the recurring themes in the books that we are reading this semester, and it is one of the main … Read More Structuring and Rectifying the Past in Jérémie Dres’ “We Won’t See Auschwitz”

+

What I Learned Acting in “Number the Stars”

Recently, my daughter auditioned for a play at the local community theater. She has been dancing for years, but she has never acted on stage before. For the past few years, she has had the desire to act, and when the auditions came around for the theatrical adaptation of Lois Lowry’s Number the Stars, she tried out for the lead role of Annemarie Johansen. … Read More What I Learned Acting in “Number the Stars”

+

Historical Context in “X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills”

If you enjoy what you read here at Interminable Rambling, think about making a contribution on our Patreon page.  Last post, I wrote about the rhetoric of fear that William Stryker espouses in Chris Claremont and Brent Eric Anderson’s X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills (1982) graphic novel. Today, I want to expand, some, upon that discussion and look at a couple of pivotal scenes … Read More Historical Context in “X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills”