Category: holocaust

+

The Quotidian in Art Spiegelman’s “Maus”: Part I

Even though the study travel trip I and a colleague planned this semester for Poland will not happen, I’m continuing to read and learn more about World War II and the Holocaust specifically. Part of this process has been teaching works such as Cynthia Ozick’s The Messiah of Stockholm and Art Spiegelman’s Maus in my Multicultural American Literature course. Along with this, I have … Read More The Quotidian in Art Spiegelman’s “Maus”: Part I

+

“Jim Crow and the Holocaust” Syllabus

The study travel trip that a colleague and I planned for Poland didn’t happen, for various reasons. However, one of the students who registered for the trip asked if I could do a directed study based on the Poland trip. I agreed to lead the directed study this summer, and I’ve been thinking, over the past few weeks, how to expand and make the … Read More “Jim Crow and the Holocaust” Syllabus

Conversation with Eir-Anne Edgar on “Maus”

In a recent post, I shared my conversation with Michael Dando about Art Spiegelman’s Maus. Along with talking about Maus with Dando, I spoke with Eir-Anne Edgar about Maus volume II for my Multicultural American Literature course. Eir-Anne recently spoke about McMinn County’s banning of Maus for an event at West Virginia University. When students read and discussed Maus volume I, they also read … Read More Conversation with Eir-Anne Edgar on “Maus”

+

Multicultural American Literature Syllabus 2022

Over the past few years, I have taught numerous multicultural American literature courses, at various levels from sophomore to graduate. This semester, the texts center around the question, “Who is American?” Unlike previous semesters, I have read or taught these texts before, so none are really new to me. However, the overarching theme and the focus of the texts has provided me with ways … Read More Multicultural American Literature Syllabus 2022

+

Narrative Construction in Art Spiegelman’s “Maus”

One thing that I really enjoy about graphic memoirs is the metanarrative nature of the medium. When reading a prose autobiography, the author typically does not draw attention to the compositional aspects of the text. For example, with Benjamin Franklin’s autobiography, we know that he writes to his son; however, he does not refer to the writing of the text or the way he … Read More Narrative Construction in Art Spiegelman’s “Maus”