Category: race

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Beauty and Love in Charlot Kristensen’s “What We Don’t Talk About”

During my recent trip to Philadelphia, I had to stop by Amalgam Comics & Coffeehouse before they closed on October 15. Thankfully, I had some time to go to Almagam, look around, and pick up a few books. On the recommendation of someone at Almagam, I got Peter Calloway and George Jeanty’s Shadow Doctor. As well, I purchased Canizales Amazona and Charlot Kristensen’s What We Don’t Talk About. I chose these books because … Read More Beauty and Love in Charlot Kristensen’s “What We Don’t Talk About”

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The System of Whiteness in Atlanta’s “Three Slaps”: Part II

In a last post, I started looking at the system of whiteness in Atlanta’s “Three Slaps,” specifically at the ways that Loquareeous’s guidance counselor at school and the social worker who takes him away from his mother work within the system of whiteness to impact Loquareeous. Today, I want to continue with that discussion, looking a little more at Loquareeous’s “disruption” in class that sparks … Read More The System of Whiteness in Atlanta’s “Three Slaps”: Part II

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The System of Whiteness in Atlanta’s “Three Slaps”: Part I

In a recent post, I looked at the illusion of whiteness in the opening scene of Atlanta’s “Three Slaps.” I delved into how the white character on the lake talks about the inaccessibility and accessibility of whiteness, and discussed Michael Collins’ feelings of comfort in the illusion of his closeness to whiteness in Dwayne McDuffie and Denys Cowan’s Deathlok. Today, I want to continue looking at … Read More The System of Whiteness in Atlanta’s “Three Slaps”: Part I

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We Must Not Remain Silent: Lillian Smith’s “Address to White Liberals”

Whenever I go to the Lillian E. Smith Center, I take time to look around, and inevitably, I always find something new that I’ve somehow missed in my previous trips. Usually, scan the numerous books that Smith has in her library, her bedroom, and elsewhere. During a recent trip, I picked up Bucklin Moon’s Primer for White Folks (1945), a book I’d picked up … Read More We Must Not Remain Silent: Lillian Smith’s “Address to White Liberals”

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Reflections in Al Feldstein and Wallace Wood’s “The Guilty!”

It’s been a few years since I’ve read Al Feldstien and Wallace Wood’s “The Guilty!” in EC Comics’ Shock SuspenStories #3 from 1952. I reread the story in preparation for an upcoming class, and as I reread it, I thought, again, about the positioning of the reader throughout “The Guilty!” Today, I want to look at this story again, expanding some on what I … Read More Reflections in Al Feldstein and Wallace Wood’s “The Guilty!”