Category: race

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We Must Not Remain Silent: Lillian Smith’s “Address to White Liberals”

Whenever I go to the Lillian E. Smith Center, I take time to look around, and inevitably, I always find something new that I’ve somehow missed in my previous trips. Usually, scan the numerous books that Smith has in her library, her bedroom, and elsewhere. During a recent trip, I picked up Bucklin Moon’s Primer for White Folks (1945), a book I’d picked up … Read More We Must Not Remain Silent: Lillian Smith’s “Address to White Liberals”

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Reflections in Al Feldstein and Wallace Wood’s “The Guilty!”

It’s been a few years since I’ve read Al Feldstien and Wallace Wood’s “The Guilty!” in EC Comics’ Shock SuspenStories #3 from 1952. I reread the story in preparation for an upcoming class, and as I reread it, I thought, again, about the positioning of the reader throughout “The Guilty!” Today, I want to look at this story again, expanding some on what I … Read More Reflections in Al Feldstein and Wallace Wood’s “The Guilty!”

Conversation with P. Djèlí Clark

Over the last couple of posts, I have written about the monstrosity of racism in P. Djèlí Clark’s Ring Shout and in David Walker, Chuck Brown, and Sanford Greene’s Bitter Root. Since I am teaching this texts this semester, I reached out to Clark to see if he might be available to Zoom in with my class. Unfortunately, he would not be able to … Read More Conversation with P. Djèlí Clark

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Martin Luther King, Jr’s “A Testament of Hope” and Our Current Moment

Last Friday, I sat down with Marie Cochran, curator of the Affriclacian Artist Project, at the Lillian E. Smith Center to record an episode of “Dope with Lime.” We sat there, on the ground where Smith worked, on what would have been Martin Luther King, Jr.’s 92nd birthday and talked about King, Smith, and memory. Preparing for our discussion, I read King’s “A Testament … Read More Martin Luther King, Jr’s “A Testament of Hope” and Our Current Moment

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Mistaken Identity in “Incognegro”?

In the last post, I wrote about Zane Pinchback discussing the social constructions of race and identity in Mt Johnson and Warren Pleece’s Incognegro. Today, I want to continue that discussion by looking at the last section of the graphic novel, specifically Zane’s comments to Alonzo upon arriving back in Harlem and the reveal at the end the final pages where the white citizens … Read More Mistaken Identity in “Incognegro”?