Category: Pedagogy

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500th Post: David F. Walker Syllabus

For a while I have been thinking about a syllabus based on the work of David F. Walker. Recently, I was spurred on to work up a tentative syllabus through a discussion online, and as such, this is what I present to you today. This syllabus is in not way complete. However, it is meant to serve as an introduction to the ways to … Read More 500th Post: David F. Walker Syllabus

“What if . . .?”: Questions About Education

The other day, Beth Loveland emailed me with her thoughts after she read Ashley McCall’s “What If We Radically Reimagined The New School Year?” As I read McCall’s article, I kept thinking about Lillian Smith and her comments to Mr. Hartley about education. McCall asks us, among a myriad of important questions, “What if we recognized that life—our day-to-day circumstances and our response to … Read More “What if . . .?”: Questions About Education

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Lillian E. Smith Reading Group: Part II

Last post, I wrote about the LES Reading Group that we are conducting this July. When I read Smith, her voices echoes through the years, speaking to this moment both nationally and internationally. I often wonder, and I hope this will be part of the reading group conversation, how she would react to this moment. How she would engage with social media. How she … Read More Lillian E. Smith Reading Group: Part II

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Lillian E. Smith Center LibGuide

One of the things I enjoy doing is creating pedagogical materials for educators, students, and the general public. When I worked at the Ernest J. Gaines Center, I collaborated on the center’s LibGuide (library guide). In my position as the director of the Lillian E. Smith Center, I taken on a similar project constructing a LibGuide for Smith and some of her works. Today, … Read More Lillian E. Smith Center LibGuide

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Flexibility, Communication, and Compassion

This past week many universities and K-12 schools have shut down face-to-face meetings and turned to online classes and coursework. This move is substantial, and there are a lot of things to consider when thinking about how we, as educators and students, will approach this shift. As such, today, I want to take a moment and walk through what I am thinking about doing … Read More Flexibility, Communication, and Compassion

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NCTE Students’ Right to Their Own Language

This semester, I am teaching an upper-level multicultural American literature course. Each of the students in this course are education majors, so as I prepared the syllabus, I was thinking about texts that would help them think about their own pedagogy in the classroom. With this thought in mind, I added texts such as Jacqueline Jones Royster’s “When the first voice you hear is … Read More NCTE Students’ Right to Their Own Language

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Teaching in Norway: Part II

On Tuesday, I started discussing pedagogy in Norway and the ways I had to adjust to a different classroom and educational environment. There, I wrote about face-to-face time and composition within the classroom. Today, I want to continue that discussion by looking at writing for master’s students and at assessment. In each of these cases, I think there are things that are beneficial for … Read More Teaching in Norway: Part II

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Teaching in Norway: Part I

It’s hard to believe that my time in Norway is almost over. This year has taught me so much, and I don’t think I’ll realize everything until I get back to the US and start to reflect more on my time here. However, there are some things that have stuck out, specifically in regard to university pedagogy. So, for this post, I want to … Read More Teaching in Norway: Part I

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Lecture for “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”

If you enjoy what you read here at Interminable Rambling, think about making a contribution on our Patreon page.  A few weeks ago, I posted about my introductory lecture for the American literature course I am teaching at the University of Bergen, and over the past few posts I have been discussing various aspects of Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884). Today, … Read More Lecture for “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”

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Music in Nate Powell’s Work

If you enjoy what you read here at Interminable Rambling, think about making a contribution on our Patreon page.  A couple of years ago, I picked up Jim Demanokas, Mark Long, and Nate Powell’s The Silence of Our Friends from the local library. Immediately, Powell’s black and white illustrations caught my attention, and I moved on to the March trilogy (John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, … Read More Music in Nate Powell’s Work

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Letter to a Young Overseer, Unexperienced

Over the course of the past few semesters, I have had students work in the Auburn University archives. As they did this, they discovered various items that may be of interest to my readers. One such item comes from the John Horry Dent collection. Dent was a wealthy plantation owner in Barbour County, AL, owing up to five plantations at one point. During his … Read More Letter to a Young Overseer, Unexperienced

Reflections on EJI Legacy Museum and Memorial for Peace and Justice

Every semester, I try something new in my classroom. Recently, I’ve been working on decentering my courses in various ways, specifically through the use of active learning assignments. These involve assignments such as my archives project  or creating more student centered discussion through the questions I pose in class. This summer, I taught a minimester course in early American literature. Essentially, we met 24 … Read More Reflections on EJI Legacy Museum and Memorial for Peace and Justice