Category: t’challa

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The Avengers and Interracial Intimacy: Part 2

If you enjoy what you read here at Interminable Rambling, think about making a contribution on our Patreon page.  Last post, I started talking about the relationship between Wanda Maximoff (Scarlet Witch) and the Vision as a metaphor for interracial intimacy during the early 1970s, only five years removed from the Supreme Court decision in Loving v. Virginia. Today, I want to finish up … Read More The Avengers and Interracial Intimacy: Part 2

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Dwayne McDuffie’s “Deathlok” and W.E.B. DuBois

Last post, I wrote about Michael Collins in Dwayne McDuffie’s Deathlok, today, I want to continue that conversation by discussing, briefly, Collins’ use of W.E.B. DuBois’ Double Consciousness when describing his identity. Michael’s quoting of DuBois is a direct continuation of his conversation with Misty Knight as the two talk in her apartment. Through these conversations, Michael and Misty Knight both navigate a world … Read More Dwayne McDuffie’s “Deathlok” and W.E.B. DuBois

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Reader Responses to Black Panther’s Debut

Last post, I wrote about how Stan Lee and Jack Kirby position the audience in Fantastic Four #52-#53. Today, I want to expand upon that discussion some and examine the ways that readers responded to T’Challa’s debut in the letters section a few issues later. A couple of weeks ago, I wrote about Henry B. Clay III’s praise of Black Panther’s debut; however, not … Read More Reader Responses to Black Panther’s Debut

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Representation and Monica Lynne’s Social Activism

Last post, I wrote about T’Challa’s role as a teacher within the community, and today I want to briefly look at Monica Lynne’s movement from an entertainer to to social activist as she begins to work as a social worker. In Avengers #73, Monica’s actions lead T’Challa to take a more active role in fighting everyday segregation and injustice within the community instead of … Read More Representation and Monica Lynne’s Social Activism

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Representation and The Black Panther as Teacher

A couple of weeks ago, I wrote about Monica Lynne’s first appearance in Avengers #73. During their first encounter, Monica Lynne causes T’Challa to see his role not just as an Avenger but as a social activist as well. Along those lines, the issues that follow, specifically Avengers #77 and #78 illuminate what T’Challa’s and Monica’s roles in the community end up being. T’Challa, … Read More Representation and The Black Panther as Teacher

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“Why haven’t you let anyone know?”: Monica Lynne First Appearance

Typically, when we talk about origin stories in comics, we focus on superheroes. Rarely do we focus on supporting or secondary characters. David Taft Terry writes about the introduction of Bill Foster and his role working with Hank Pym; however, that is the only real discussion, so far, I have seen on supporting characters. After reading Sam Wilson’s (Falcon) origin story, I decided to … Read More “Why haven’t you let anyone know?”: Monica Lynne First Appearance

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The “Double V Campaign” in “Captain America/Black Panther: Flags of Our Fathers”

Recently, I’ve been writing about Christopher Priest’s Black Panther, specifically about Priest’s use of Everett K. Ross, “Emperor of Useless White Boys,” as the narrative voice of the book. Today, I want to look at some of Reginald Hudlin’s work as head of Black Panther. I have read a couple of issues of Hudlin’s run, but I do not want to focus on those … Read More The “Double V Campaign” in “Captain America/Black Panther: Flags of Our Fathers”

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Everett K. Ross as Mephisto? Positioning in Christopher Priest’s Black Panther

In the previous post, I wrote about the narrative point-of-view (pov) in Christopher Priest’s Black Panther (1998-2003). There, I discussed Priest’s comments about placing Everett K. Ross as the narrator of Black Panther and how that narrative position related to the work of Quentin Tarantino. Today, I want to look at a shift that occurs in issue #34, part one of “Gorilla Warfare.” Ross’ … Read More Everett K. Ross as Mephisto? Positioning in Christopher Priest’s Black Panther

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Everett K. Ross “Emperor of Useless White Boys” in Christopher Priest’s Black Panther

Over the past few weeks, I have been working my way through Christopher Priest’s Black Panther (1998-2003). There are numerous aspects of Priest’s run that could, and should, be discussed; however, I want to focus on one aspect that I have been looking at in other works as well, the narrative point-of-view (pov). For Black Panther, Priest chose to convey the story from the … Read More Everett K. Ross “Emperor of Useless White Boys” in Christopher Priest’s Black Panther

The Black Panther in The Past, The Present, and the Future in Jungle Action #22

For the past couple of posts, I have written about “The Panther vs. The Klan” story arc from Marvel’s Jungle Action series in the 1970s. Today, I want to finish up this discussion by looking at issue 22 where Jessica Lynne tells the story of Cousin Caleb’s encounters with the Klan and White Supremacy after the Civil War in 1867. Along with Jessica’s recollections … Read More The Black Panther in The Past, The Present, and the Future in Jungle Action #22

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The Myth of America and The Black Panther in Jungle Action

Last post, I wrote about the scene that opens Jungle Action #20 where T’Challa, in full Black Panther costume, and Monica Lynne shop at a grocery store and get attacked but Klan members. The scene, while action packed, draws attention to T’Challa’s humanity and causes the reader to confront racial profiling and surveillance of black bodies by whites, Rebecca Winthrop, along with the rest … Read More The Myth of America and The Black Panther in Jungle Action

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The Black Panther and Racial Profiling in Jungle Action #20

In preparation for the February 2018 premier of the Black Panther film, I started to delve into Don McGregor’s incarnation of Black Panther in the revived Jungle Action series from 1972-1976. The reemergence of the series, and the foregrounding of T’Challa took place in correlation with Marvel’s launching of Luke Cage, a series that looked to capitalize on the rise of Blaxploitation films during the … Read More The Black Panther and Racial Profiling in Jungle Action #20