Category: double conciousness

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Language in William Faulkner’s “The Sound and the Fury”: Part I

Over the past few posts, I have been writing about Ernest Hemingway, modernism, the ways that language constructs meaning, and how authors such as Hemingway interrogated these constructions. Today, I want to look briefly at another modernist author who does the same thing in a slightly different manner than Hemingway. That author, of course, is William Faulkner, and the novel is The Sound and … Read More Language in William Faulkner’s “The Sound and the Fury”: Part I

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Rhetorically Examining Zora Neale Hurston’s “How It Feels to be Colored Me!”

A few posts ago, I wrote about W.E.B. Du Bois and double consciousness. As part of this discussion, I looked at the ways that some artists, such as Charles Chesnutt and Frank Yerby navigated the literary landscape in relation to what readers expected from their works and how readers responded. Today, I want to briefly take a look at Zora Neale Hurston’s “How It … Read More Rhetorically Examining Zora Neale Hurston’s “How It Feels to be Colored Me!”

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The Paradox of Writing to Get the “Bigots”

If you enjoy what you read here at Interminable Rambling, think about making a contribution on our Patreon page.  Over the past few posts, I have been discussing how authors such as Frank Yerby, Claude McKay, and Zora Neale Hurston counter western ideals of beauty, specifically ideals of white beauty. Over the next couple of posts, I want to move back a little and … Read More The Paradox of Writing to Get the “Bigots”

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Dwayne McDuffie’s “Deathlok” and W.E.B. DuBois

Last post, I wrote about Michael Collins in Dwayne McDuffie’s Deathlok, today, I want to continue that conversation by discussing, briefly, Collins’ use of W.E.B. DuBois’ Double Consciousness when describing his identity. Michael’s quoting of DuBois is a direct continuation of his conversation with Misty Knight as the two talk in her apartment. Through these conversations, Michael and Misty Knight both navigate a world … Read More Dwayne McDuffie’s “Deathlok” and W.E.B. DuBois