Category: jim crow

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Hitler, Nazism, Jim Crow, and the United States: Part II

Last post, I started looking at the conenctions between Nazi Germany and the Jim Crow South. Today, I want to continue that examination by looking at the post-war period. In 1951, the Civil Rights Congress presented We Charge Genocide to the United Nations. The document demonstrates how the United States violated the U.N. Genocide Convention and took part in the genocide of over 15,000,000 … Read More Hitler, Nazism, Jim Crow, and the United States: Part II

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Hitler, Nazism, Jim Crow, and the United States: Part I

In the Spring 1942-1943 issue of South Today, Lillian Smith and Paula Snelling wrote two articles: “Buying a New World with Old Confederate Bills” and “Addressed to Intelligent White Southerners: There are things to do.” Each of these articles confront the connections between the Jim Crow South, and the United States as a whole, and Nazism in Germany and the European theatre. At one … Read More Hitler, Nazism, Jim Crow, and the United States: Part I

“Is it starting here, yet?”

Madison Square Garden (MSG) played host to the “Pro American Rally” on February 20, 1939. Over 20,000 people packed into MSG to take part in the rally where they recited the Pledge of Allegiance, sang the National Anthem, and listened to speeches. The rally took place to coincide with George Washington’s birthday, and a large image of America’s first president gazed down on the … Read More “Is it starting here, yet?”

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Eando Binder’s “The Teacher from Mars” and Jim Crow

In my Literature and Composition Graphic Memoirs class, I taught Eando Binder’s “The Teacher from Mars” along with the graphic adaptation written by Otto Binder and Al Feldstein and drawn by Joe Orlando. Today, I want to talk about the story, and in the next post, I want to look at the some of the elements of the adaptation along with Feldstein and Orlando’s … Read More Eando Binder’s “The Teacher from Mars” and Jim Crow

Why do we read literature?; or, Questions from the Classroom

During a class discussion last week on Ernest Hemingway’s “Big Two-Hearted River,” a student asked, “Why do we read literature? Why do we read Hemingway?” I provided a generic answer and tried to get the class to respond with their own ideas. This method completely failed. I told the class, “I cannot give you a definitive answer to that question.” I went on to … Read More Why do we read literature?; or, Questions from the Classroom