Category: strange fruit

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Laurel Falls Camp at 100

Note: This article originally appeared in the Spring 2020 issue of “A View from the Mountain,” the Lillian E. Smith Center’s newsletter. This year marks the 100th anniversary of Laurel Falls Camp. Lillian Smith’s father, Calvin, opened the camp in 1920, and it was the first private camp for girls in the state of Georgia. “Miss Lil,” as the campers called her, took over … Read More Laurel Falls Camp at 100

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LES Center Videos: III

In early December, I shared two posts with some of the weekly videos that I have been creating for the LES Center. Since then, I have created more videos, and I wanted to take a moment to share some of them with you today. These videos focus on talks she had with campers at Laurel Falls about racism, the ways that Smith connected her … Read More LES Center Videos: III

“Celebrating Lillian Smith” Symposium

This year marks the 75th anniversary of Lillian E. Smith’s Strange Fruit and the 70th of Killers of the Dream. To celebrate, the Lillian E. Smith Center will host a symposium on October 26 in Athens, GA, to celebrate Lillian Smith’s life, work, and legacy. You can find more information below. Even if you cannot make the symposium, please share it on social media … Read More “Celebrating Lillian Smith” Symposium

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“Everything would be the same–as it always was.”

In last Thursday’s post, I wrote about the image of dirt in Lillian E. Smith’s Strange Fruit (1944). Today, I want to continue looking at Smith’s novel. Instead of focusing on Tracy Dean as I did in the last post, I want to take a moment and examine the ways that Nonnie and Bess Anderson, along with Dessie, react to what occurs in the … Read More “Everything would be the same–as it always was.”

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Black Labor in Waid and Jones’ “Strange Fruit”

My expectations going into Mark Waid and J.G. Jones’ Strange Fruit were high. I expected to encounter, between the covers, a work that would explore “themes of racism, cultural legacy, and human nature.” Overall, I was a little underwhelmed, and I even questioned the purpose of the comic itself. If, as Waid and Jones argued, they wanted to present a text that examined issues … Read More Black Labor in Waid and Jones’ “Strange Fruit”