Category: martin luther king, jr

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The Local and the National

As I reread the March trilogy, I kept thinking about, as I’ve written about recently, the things that March doesn’t cover in regard to the Civil Rights Movement. Like I’ve mentioned before, this is understandable, especially since the trilogy centers on John Lewis and his work. Today, though, I want to talk about ways that educators can use March as a starting point to … Read More The Local and the National

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“America has not yet changed because so many think it need not change”: My Trip to Washington D.C.

Recently, my son has been obsessed with the presidents, and he has wanted to visit Washington D.C. to see the portraits, memorials, and much more. As a result of his interest, we took a trip to Washington D.C. to visit the memorials and see the sites. Walking through D.C., I started thinking, again, about the ways we construct and interact with history. Specifically, I … Read More “America has not yet changed because so many think it need not change”: My Trip to Washington D.C.

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Keri Leigh Merritt “History Marker Honoring Lillian Smith”

Yesterday, the Lillian E. Smith Center unveiled a historical marker honoring Smith’s life. work, and legacy. I am still process this event and its impact because as the program commenced and went on, I found myself becoming overwhelmed with emotions, and I am still, right now, processing those thoughts. I plan to write about the ceremony in an upcoming post. Today, though, I want … Read More Keri Leigh Merritt “History Marker Honoring Lillian Smith”

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Hate, the Oldest Commodity, in “Superman Smashes the Klan”

Hate sells, and it’s profitable as hell. This isn’t anything new or revelatory, I know. Lillian Smith pointed it out in Killers of the Dream when she talked about wealthy whites, in order to maintain their power, enlisted poor whites in hate against African Americans and others following Reconstruction and into the Jim Crow era and beyond, flattening whiteness. Martin Luther King, Jr. pointed … Read More Hate, the Oldest Commodity, in “Superman Smashes the Klan”

Severed History in Nate Powell’s “Save It For Later”: Part IV

“Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King, I Have a Dream.” This is the nine-word problem that informs much of our understanding of the Civil Rights Movement. It begins with Rosa Parks in Montgomery in 1955, carries through King during the bus boycotts and into 1963 where he delivered his famous “I Have a Dream Speech” on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial during the March on … Read More Severed History in Nate Powell’s “Save It For Later”: Part IV