Category: identity

Conversation with Malaka Gharib

In my Multicultural American Literature course this semester, we are reading Malaka Gharib’s graphic memoir I Was Their American Dream. As I was constructing my syllabus for the course, I was looking for graphic memoirs, and I came across Gharib’s book. I scanned a few pages on Amazon and though, “This is great.” So, I ordered it, read it, and assigned it for the course. I reached out to … Read More Conversation with Malaka Gharib

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Identity in Adrian Tomine “The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Cartoonist”

Before I even picked it up and started reading, Adrian Tomine’s The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Cartoonist grabbed my attention, specifically because of it tangible, tactile features which mirror a sketch book. Of course when I started reading, various things stood out. One such instance occurs when Tomine starts to have chest pains and is carrying his daughter up the stairs. During this sequence, … Read More Identity in Adrian Tomine “The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Cartoonist”

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Constructing Narratives in Jennine Capó Crucet’s “Make Your Home Among Strangers”

Stories connect us. We tell stories to create and share our commonalities, leading in many ways to the myths we tell ourselves as nations and communities. Along with these aspects, we tell stories to share with others information about ourselves: our likes, our dislikes, our identities. It is this latter aspect that I want to look at some today because both Lizet and her … Read More Constructing Narratives in Jennine Capó Crucet’s “Make Your Home Among Strangers”

Reaching Our Whole Self

If you have read my blog over the last couple of years, you know I have been thinking a lot about whether or not we can truly know ourselves. At the core of this inquiry is whether or not we can ever disentangle ourselves from all of the cultural, familial, and other influences that pour themselves into us on a daily basis. These factors … Read More Reaching Our Whole Self

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Mistaken Identity in “Incognegro”?

In the last post, I wrote about Zane Pinchback discussing the social constructions of race and identity in Mt Johnson and Warren Pleece’s Incognegro. Today, I want to continue that discussion by looking at the last section of the graphic novel, specifically Zane’s comments to Alonzo upon arriving back in Harlem and the reveal at the end the final pages where the white citizens … Read More Mistaken Identity in “Incognegro”?