Category: kate chopin

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Charles Chesnutt and the Plantation Tradition

Last week, I wrote about race in two local stories by George Washington Cable and Kate Chopin. Over the next couple of posts, I want to look at the ways that authors such as Charles Chesnutt and Paul Laurence Dunbar work to counter the plantation tradition and specifically the continued perpetuation of an idealized South during the latter part of the nineteenth century and … Read More Charles Chesnutt and the Plantation Tradition

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Kate Chopin’s “Désirée’s Baby” and the Social Constrction of Race

Last post, I wrote about the idea of race as a social construct  in George Washington Cable’s “‘Tite Poulette.” Today, I want to examine another story set in Louisiana and how it highlights race as a social construct. To that end. I will discuss Kate Chopin’s “Désirée’s Baby,” a story that originally appeared in Vogue in 1893. Like Cable’s story, “Désirée’s Baby” challenges the … Read More Kate Chopin’s “Désirée’s Baby” and the Social Constrction of Race