Category: louisiana literature

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The Roots Beneath Our Feet

Currently, I’m working on a paper that looks at the ways that Attica Locke’s The Cutting Season, amongst other things, critiques the plantation tourism industry in the South. As I was researching, I came across Rebecca C. McIntyre’s “Promoting the Gothic South,” an article that explores the ways that travel writers, after the Civil War, began to construct images of the South, specifically in … Read More The Roots Beneath Our Feet

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“Miss Jane is not in them”: Voices in Historical Narratives

Over the past couple of posts, I have written about the role of history and literature in countering prevailing myths about the past and the present. Today, I want to continue that discussion by looking at a couple of scene from Ernest J. Gaines’ The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman (1971). On Thursday, I will finish this series by looking at a section from … Read More “Miss Jane is not in them”: Voices in Historical Narratives

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I’m the Victim of America’s Sin. I’m What Sin Is.

Over the last couple of posts, I have written about Jeff Nichols’ Loving and the legal constructions of race. Today, I want to conclude that discussion by looking some at Jean Toomer’s Cane (1923) and Ernest J. Gaines’ The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman (1971). In each of these texts, published close to fifty years apart, Toomer and Gaines highlight the ways that words … Read More I’m the Victim of America’s Sin. I’m What Sin Is.

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Interracial Intimacy in Ernest Gaines’ “Bloodline”

As I read Ernest Gaines’ “Bloodline” recently, the interactions between ‘Malia and Frank Laurent stood out. The story, essentially, centers around Copper, the son of Frank’s brother Walter who raped Copper’s mother. Copper has returned to the Laurent plantation to claim what is his, by birth. Essentially, he arrives to overthrow the system that denies him an existence due to the fact that his … Read More Interracial Intimacy in Ernest Gaines’ “Bloodline”

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Update from Norway!

Since it has been a while since I have shared an update about our time here in Norway, I thought today would be a good time to do it. From the beginning, we decided to partake in this adventure for what it promised, a once in a lifetime experience for the kids and our family as a whole. We embarked to Norway in hopes … Read More Update from Norway!

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Internalized Ideas of Beauty in Genaro Kỳ Lý Smith’s “Perfect in Parts”

If you enjoy what you read here at Interminable Rambling, think about making a contribution on our Patreon page.  Recently, I had the chance to read Genaro Kỳ Lý Smith’s new collection of short stories, The Beautiful Ones are Not Yet Born (UL Press 2018). One story that immediately caught my attention was “Perfect in Parts,” a piece that, like Claude McKay’s Banana Bottom and Frank … Read More Internalized Ideas of Beauty in Genaro Kỳ Lý Smith’s “Perfect in Parts”

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Charles Chesnutt’s “Paul Marchand” and the Social Construction of Race: Part I

If you enjoy what you read here at Interminable Rambling, think about making a contribution on our Patreon page.  Charles Chesnutt’s Paul Marchand, F.M.C. highlights the legal fictions constructing race in America and the absolute absurdity of such constructions. Today, I want to look at some of the ways that Chesnutt illuminates the construction of race through legal fictions in the novel. Chesnutt explores … Read More Charles Chesnutt’s “Paul Marchand” and the Social Construction of Race: Part I

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Celebrating Three Years! Top Five Posts and Most Viewed!

Somehow, I failed to recognise that last Thursday’s post on David F. Walker’s Luke Cage was my 300th post on Interminable Rambling. That means that this site has been live, in one form or another, for three years. A lot has happened in those three years, and I have written about a lot of subjects. Typically, I try to keep my posts around 1,000 … Read More Celebrating Three Years! Top Five Posts and Most Viewed!

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“The Prince of Pulpsters” or “Debunker of Myths”: Frank Yerby Syllabus

When reading Frank Yerby’s work, I keep asking one question over and over again: “Why isn’t anyone teaching these texts?” I know that some scholars teach Yerby; however, compared to other authors, his appearance in the classroom is minuscule. I had heard the name, in passing, during my graduate work; however, I never saw him in any anthologies or read any of his books … Read More “The Prince of Pulpsters” or “Debunker of Myths”: Frank Yerby Syllabus

Multicultural Cities in Frank Yerby

Throughout his oeuvre, Frank Yerby works to deconstruct myths of the Old South and historical misinformation. Along with these goals, he also dismantles the dichotomy of Black and White; instead, he populates his works with individuals and scenes that defy a simplistic characterization. In this manner, Yerby shows that race is not a biological fact; rather, it is a social construct. One of the … Read More Multicultural Cities in Frank Yerby

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Interview with Genaro Kỳ Lý Smith Part II

If you enjoy what you read here at Interminable Rambling, think about making a contribution on our Patreon page.  Note: You can win an autographed copy of Genaro Kỳ Lý Smith The Land South of The Clouds. Just tweet or retweet this post or next Tuesday’s post for your chance to win (make sure to tag me so I know you Tweeted it  @silaslapham). You can … Read More Interview with Genaro Kỳ Lý Smith Part II

Interview with Genaro Kỳ Lý Smith Part I

If you enjoy what you read here at Interminable Rambling, think about making a contribution on our Patreon page.  Note: You can win an autographed copy of Genaro Kỳ Lý Smith The Land South of The Clouds. Just tweet or retweet this post or next Tuesday’s post for your chance to win (make sure to tag me so I know you Tweeted it  @silaslapham). You can … Read More Interview with Genaro Kỳ Lý Smith Part I