Month: October 2016

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Academia, How We Should Respond to Student Writing

Last Thursday, Tiffany Martinez, a first generation Latina college student at Suffolk University, posted “Academia, Love Me Back” on her blog. The post, written by the McNair Fellow, describes how a professor accused her or plagiarism for using the transition word “hence” and called her out during class. The teacher, in front of the class, told her “This is not your language,” and on … Read More Academia, How We Should Respond to Student Writing

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Phillis Wheatley’s “To Maecenas” and Subversion

If you enjoy what you read here at Interminable Rambling, think about making a contribution on our Patreon page.  While some critics see Phillis Wheatley as a poet who does not address racism and slavery in her poetry, some, like Frances Smith Foster, read the poet as revising “traditional poetic forms and language to accommodate new messages” and to ultimately present her writing as … Read More Phillis Wheatley’s “To Maecenas” and Subversion

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Lydia Maria Child’s “Chocorua’s Curse” and America’s Literary Presence

Previously, I have written about calls for distinctly American literature in the early part of the eighteen hundreds and the role of newspaper reporting in Lydia Maria Child’s “Slavery’s Pleasant Homes.” Today, I want to take a moment and look at Child’s “Chocorua’s Curse,” a short story that originally appeared in The Token in 1830. (Page 257 in the link.) Child’s story, short as … Read More Lydia Maria Child’s “Chocorua’s Curse” and America’s Literary Presence

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“Theresa, A Haytian Tale” and the “Tropical Sublime”

Thirteen years before Victor Sejour’s “The Mulatto” (1841), S’s serialized story “Theresa, A Haytien Tale” (1828) appeared in the Freedom’s Journal between January 18 and February 15, 1828. Now, scholars believe that S’s  story is the first short story by an African American author; however, there may be something else tucked away in a library, archive, or collection somewhere in the world. Whether or … Read More “Theresa, A Haytian Tale” and the “Tropical Sublime”

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Archives and Collaborative Documents in the Literature Classroom

Last Tuesday, I wrote about some of the ways I have been implementing technology into my composition and literature classrooms. Today, I want to speak about a couple of more ways that I am incorporating the Internet and Web 2.0 tools into the literature classroom.