Category: college language association

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Some Reflections on CLA 2018

In Tuesday’s post, I took the time to expand upon some thoughts, ideas, and advice for scholars and students attending academic conferences. The anecdotes I shared arose out of my experiences at this years College Language Association (CLA) convention in Chicago. Today, I want to take a moment and reflect upon some of the amazing papers that I had the opportunity to hear at … Read More Some Reflections on CLA 2018

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Networking and Conferencing: Part II

Note: 2016 CLA post and 2017 CLA post. A few weeks ago, I posted some tips about networking and conferencing. As well, over the past couple of years, I have written about my experiences at the annual College Language Association (CLA) convention. For a little background, founded in 1937 by Black scholars and educators, CLA fosters innovative scholarship and study that “serves the academic, … Read More Networking and Conferencing: Part II

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Some Thoughts on Networking and Conferences

The other day, I read Derek Attig’s “Tips for Making the Most Out of Conferences” and it got me to thinking about what advice I would give to a humanities student or others on this topic. So, today, I want to briefly share some of the things I have learned over the last fifteen years about conferencing, and more importantly networking. This will by … Read More Some Thoughts on Networking and Conferences

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Jacqueline Woodson’s “brown girl dreaming” and Langston Hughes

At the 2016 College Language Association ¬†(CLA) conference in Houston, TX, I went to a panel organized by the Langston Hughes Society, and I heard Sharon Lynette Jones present on Jacqueline Woodson’s literary relationship to Hughes in her book¬†brown girl dreaming (2014). Jones spoke on the textual interplay between Hughes and Woodson, specifically focusing on Hughes’s “Dreams” and Woodson’s “learning from langston.” Jones’s presentation … Read More Jacqueline Woodson’s “brown girl dreaming” and Langston Hughes

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The White Presence in Jesmyn Ward’s “Salvage the Bones”

After attending the 2016 College Language Association (CLA) conference, I finally read Jesmyn Ward’s Salvage the Bones (2011). Ward provided the keynote speech at the conference’s awards banquet, and upon hearing her, I knew that I had to reach onto my shelf, pull down Esch’s story, and read it. The novel, of course, contains numerous items that warrant exploration and discussion. At CLA, I … Read More The White Presence in Jesmyn Ward’s “Salvage the Bones”