Category: memory

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Photographs and Memory in Thi Bui’s “The Best We Could Do”: Part III

Over the last two posts, I have looked at the ways that Thi Bui deploys photographs in her graphic memoir The Best We Could Do, exploring how these photographs function not only in relation to the narrative but also in relation to the construction of memory within in the text. Today, I want to finish my examination of photographs and memory in Bui’s graphic … Read More Photographs and Memory in Thi Bui’s “The Best We Could Do”: Part III

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Photographs and Memory in Thi Bui’s “The Best We Could Do”: Part II

In my previous post, I started writing about photographs and constructions of memory in Thi Bui’s The Best We Could Do. Over the past year, I’ve been drawn to the ways that graphic memoirists use actual photographs within their work. Occasionally, they use actual copies of the photographs, but for the majority of the texts that I have looked at, creators reproduce the photographs, … Read More Photographs and Memory in Thi Bui’s “The Best We Could Do”: Part II

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Photographs and Memories in Thi Bui’s “The Best We Could Do”: Part I

In my last post, I looked at the role of photographs in Malaka Gharib’s I Was Their American Dream. Today, I want to continue that discussion by looking at the ways that Thi Bui depicts and deploys photographs in The Best We Could Do, a graphic memoir about her family’s escape from South Vietnam and immigration to the United States in 1970s. On the … Read More Photographs and Memories in Thi Bui’s “The Best We Could Do”: Part I

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Photographs and Memory in Malaka Gharib’s “I Was Their American Dream”

A few weeks ago, I read Malaka Gharib’s I Was Their American Dream. Gharib’s graphic memoir details coming of age as a first generation American immigrant, the daughter of a Filipino mother and Egyptian father. She explores the ways that she struggled with her identity, and the ways that she felt pulled, a lot of the time, in at least three directions in this … Read More Photographs and Memory in Malaka Gharib’s “I Was Their American Dream”

The Memory Beneath Our Feet

A couple of weeks ago I received my copy of Box of Bones, a project created by Ayize Jama Everett and John Jennings. Book one contains five stories, each written and illustrated by different artists. The overarching connective tissue within Box of Bones is Lindsay Ford, a PhD student in Folklore/African American Studies at UC Berkeley. Ford’s work centers on the Box of Bones, … Read More The Memory Beneath Our Feet