Category: comics

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Black Labor in Waid and Jones’ “Strange Fruit”

My expectations going into Mark Waid and J.G. Jones’ Strange Fruit were high. I expected to encounter, between the covers, a work that would explore “themes of racism, cultural legacy, and human nature.” Overall, I was a little underwhelmed, and I even questioned the purpose of the comic itself. If, as Waid and Jones argued, they wanted to present a text that examined issues … Read More Black Labor in Waid and Jones’ “Strange Fruit”

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Literature and Political Commentary in Brian Vaughan and Fiona Staples’ “Saga”

Crazy and unexpected! That is the only way I can truly describe what I experienced when I first started reading Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples’ Saga (2012). On almost every trip to the library to find new books, I would pick up Saga and flip the pages. Time and time again I would put it back on the shelf because it looked, in … Read More Literature and Political Commentary in Brian Vaughan and Fiona Staples’ “Saga”

The Master Narrative in Alan Moore’s “Swamp Thing”

Last post, I wrote about some of the Gothic elements in issues #41 and #42 of Alan Moore’s Swamp Thing and the repetition of the “unsuccessfully repressed.” Today, I want to continue that discussion some by looking at the conclusion of issue #42, “Strange Fruit.” Rather than breaking with the past by burning the roots of hate and prejudice, the space shifts from Robertaland … Read More The Master Narrative in Alan Moore’s “Swamp Thing”

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Comics and Race Syllabus

Over the past couple of years, I have really started to dive into comics and graphic novels. Initially, I would just look through the local library to find books on the shelf. Here, I found texts such as Southern Bastards, Scalped, Bayou, I Am Alfonso Jones, and more. Since then, I have started looking at these texts more, especially series such as Black Panther and … Read More Comics and Race Syllabus

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Dwayne McDuffie’s “Deathlok” and W.E.B. DuBois

Last post, I wrote about Michael Collins in Dwayne McDuffie’s Deathlok, today, I want to continue that conversation by discussing, briefly, Collins’ use of W.E.B. DuBois’ Double Consciousness when describing his identity. Michael’s quoting of DuBois is a direct continuation of his conversation with Misty Knight as the two talk in her apartment. Through these conversations, Michael and Misty Knight both navigate a world … Read More Dwayne McDuffie’s “Deathlok” and W.E.B. DuBois