Category: comics

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Everett K. Ross as Mephisto? Positioning in Christopher Priest’s Black Panther

In the previous post, I wrote about the narrative point-of-view (pov) in Christopher Priest’s Black Panther (1998-2003). There, I discussed Priest’s comments about placing Everett K. Ross as the narrator of Black Panther and how that narrative position related to the work of Quentin Tarantino. Today, I want to look at a shift that occurs in issue #34, part one of “Gorilla Warfare.” Ross’ … Read More Everett K. Ross as Mephisto? Positioning in Christopher Priest’s Black Panther

Luke Cage, Stagolee, and the Importance of Myth

Mike Benson and Adam Glass’Luke Cage Noir (2009-2010) pulls from a Noir aesthetic full of femme fatales, double crosses, and private eyes all within Prohibition Era Harlem. The story turns Luke Cage into a Noir protagonist that struggles with life outside of prison, ultimately killing himself at the end of issue #4. It is Luke Cage’s death that struck me in this story, and … Read More Luke Cage, Stagolee, and the Importance of Myth

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Unheard Voices and “Truth: Red, White, and Black”

Put a dollar to your ear, you can hear the moaning of a slave America the great was built off the labor that they gave–Sho Baraka “Maybe Both, 1865” Over the past few weeks, I have been reading through various story arcs and volumes in the Marvel Universe. Specifically, I am reading Christopher Priest’s Black Panther (1998-2003), Mike Benson’s Luke Cage: Noir (2009), and … Read More Unheard Voices and “Truth: Red, White, and Black”

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The Myth of America and The Black Panther in Jungle Action

Last post, I wrote about the scene that opens Jungle Action #20 where T’Challa, in full Black Panther costume, and Monica Lynne shop at a grocery store and get attacked but Klan members. The scene, while action packed, draws attention to T’Challa’s humanity and causes the reader to confront racial profiling and surveillance of black bodies by whites, Rebecca Winthrop, along with the rest … Read More The Myth of America and The Black Panther in Jungle Action

Jackie Ormes’ “Patty-Jo ‘n’ Ginger” Part 1

Over her career, Jackie Ormes produced four comics for newspapers such as the Pittsburgh Courier and the Chicago Defender. Continually hitting up the journalistic glass ceiling in the early to mid-1900s, Ormes, along with her newspaper pieces on fashion, sports, and other topics, penned comics that tackled the political issues facing African Americans, and specifically African American women, during the period: Torchy Brown (1930s), … Read More Jackie Ormes’ “Patty-Jo ‘n’ Ginger” Part 1