Category: william faulkner

Art and Creation

In “Going Empty,” Dessa writes about filming the music video for her song “Sound the Bells.” She talks about learning to control her breathing to dive underwater amidst Jason deCaires Taylor’s submerged sculptures off the coast of Mexico. She ruminates about her career, writing about the fears that time is rapidly running out on commercial success. She thinks, Yet all my life I’ve been … Read More Art and Creation

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Language in William Faulkner’s “The Sound and the Fury”: Part II

Last post, I started discussing the ways that William Faulkner, in The Sound and the Fury (1929), explores the ways that language and words construct meaning and social hierarchies. Today, I want to continue that discussion by zeroing in on a couple of more scenes in Quentin’s section, specifically the scene where he talks with the three boys who are going fishing and the … Read More Language in William Faulkner’s “The Sound and the Fury”: Part II

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Language in William Faulkner’s “The Sound and the Fury”: Part I

Over the past few posts, I have been writing about Ernest Hemingway, modernism, the ways that language constructs meaning, and how authors such as Hemingway interrogated these constructions. Today, I want to look briefly at another modernist author who does the same thing in a slightly different manner than Hemingway. That author, of course, is William Faulkner, and the novel is The Sound and … Read More Language in William Faulkner’s “The Sound and the Fury”: Part I

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“Introduction to Modernism: Modernism and Ernest J. Gaines” Syllabus

As part of my Fulbright application, I proposed two courses for my time at the University of Bergen. I have already posted one of these syallbi, “African American Literature and the American South.” This course will be an MA level course, and I am currently in the process of finalizing the readings. They have changed, some, since I initially posted the syllabus. When I … Read More “Introduction to Modernism: Modernism and Ernest J. Gaines” Syllabus

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Josephine’s Invisibility in Kevin Sacco’s “Josephine”

Kevin Sacco’s Josephine (2017) is poignant and moving. Told only through sepia colored panels, without words, the semi-autobiographical Josephine centers on a seven year-old protagonist as he navigates Manhattan’s Upper West Side in the 1960s, guided in part by his Black caretaker, Josephine. Josephine is, as Sacco notes, a melding together “of my caretakers. . . Leonora, Cleo, Mildred, Louise, and Josephine.” Through Josephine, Sacco’s tale … Read More Josephine’s Invisibility in Kevin Sacco’s “Josephine”

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Interracial Intimacy in Feldstein and Wood’s “Under Cover” and “The Whipping!”

If you enjoy what you read here at Interminable Rambling, think about making a contribution on our Patreon page.  Today, I am concluding my posts on some of Al Feldstein an Wallace Wood’s stories from EC Comics’ Shock SuspenStories by looking at “Under Cover” and “The Whipping!” Both of these stories deal with the fears surrounding interracial intimacy and the ways that these fears manifested … Read More Interracial Intimacy in Feldstein and Wood’s “Under Cover” and “The Whipping!”

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Confronting the Reader in Feldstein and Wood’s “The Guilty!”

Last Thursday, I wrote about the ways that Al Feldstein and Wallace Wood countered racism in their story “Hate!” which appeared in EC Comics’ Shock SuspenStories #5. Over the next couple of posts, I want to take a look at three more stories by the duo: “Guilty!,” “Under Cover,” and “The Whipping!” I do not have enough space to thoroughly delve into each story; … Read More Confronting the Reader in Feldstein and Wood’s “The Guilty!”

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Minnie Cooper and John McClendon in Faulkner’s “Dry September”

Last Thursday, I wrote about the “blank spaces” in William Faulkner’s “Dry September” and some works by Ernest J. Gaines. Today, I want to look at a couple of scenes in Faulkner’s story and discuss the ways that Faulkner delves into the psychological effects of lynchings and racial violence on the perpetrators themselves. As such, I will briefly discuss Minnie Cooper and John McClendon … Read More Minnie Cooper and John McClendon in Faulkner’s “Dry September”

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The Blank Spots in Faulkner’s “Dry September” and Ernest Gaines

I’ve written about the image of dust in William Faulkner’s “Dry September” (1931) on this blog before, and today I would like to look at another aspect of Faulkner’s story that struck me as I reread it recently. Faulkner never shows McClendon and the mob lynch Will Mayes; however, we know that is exactly what happens because as they return in the car, Hawkshaw … Read More The Blank Spots in Faulkner’s “Dry September” and Ernest Gaines

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Collaborative Project for Literature Classroom

Last semester, I had students construct presentations of terms and historical events in my Early American Literature survey course. I have a posts on the assignment itself and on some of the projects that students created. This semester, I am tweaking that assignment in a couple of ways. Rather than having students present on specific terms and presenting during the last week of class, … Read More Collaborative Project for Literature Classroom

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Iceberg Slim’s “Lonely Suite” and the Gothic

Throughout Iceberg Slim’s literary career, he wrote to dissuade his readers away from the Life. As such, his stories of the urban ghettos of Chicago and the Midwest served as not just political critiques on an oppressive system but also as didactic narratives. Of course, some individuals misread these cues, as Slim himself writes about in “Rappin About the Pimp Game.” Today, I want … Read More Iceberg Slim’s “Lonely Suite” and the Gothic

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Some Pedagogical Takeaways from the NEH Summer Institute

Part of this post appears in “‘I think Aladdin looked kinda white’: Teaching Cultural Projection in the Classroom” on the Pedagogy and American Literary Studies’ blog. The links throughout provide more insight into the technique being discussed.  During the NEH Summer Institute, Ernest J. Gaines and the Southern Experience, pedagogy was a big topic of discussion. Throughout the institute, the visiting lecturers and scholars shared with … Read More Some Pedagogical Takeaways from the NEH Summer Institute