Category: william faulkner

Art and Creation

In “Going Empty,” Dessa writes about filming the music video for her song “Sound the Bells.” She talks about learning to control her breathing to dive underwater amidst Jason deCaires Taylor’s submerged sculptures off the coast of Mexico. She ruminates about her career, writing about the fears that time is rapidly running out on commercial success. She thinks, Yet all my life I’ve been … Read More Art and Creation

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Language in William Faulkner’s “The Sound and the Fury”: Part II

Last post, I started discussing the ways that William Faulkner, in The Sound and the Fury (1929), explores the ways that language and words construct meaning and social hierarchies. Today, I want to continue that discussion by zeroing in on a couple of more scenes in Quentin’s section, specifically the scene where he talks with the three boys who are going fishing and the … Read More Language in William Faulkner’s “The Sound and the Fury”: Part II

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Language in William Faulkner’s “The Sound and the Fury”: Part I

Over the past few posts, I have been writing about Ernest Hemingway, modernism, the ways that language constructs meaning, and how authors such as Hemingway interrogated these constructions. Today, I want to look briefly at another modernist author who does the same thing in a slightly different manner than Hemingway. That author, of course, is William Faulkner, and the novel is The Sound and … Read More Language in William Faulkner’s “The Sound and the Fury”: Part I

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“Introduction to Modernism: Modernism and Ernest J. Gaines” Syllabus

As part of my Fulbright application, I proposed two courses for my time at the University of Bergen. I have already posted one of these syallbi, “African American Literature and the American South.” This course will be an MA level course, and I am currently in the process of finalizing the readings. They have changed, some, since I initially posted the syllabus. When I … Read More “Introduction to Modernism: Modernism and Ernest J. Gaines” Syllabus

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Josephine’s Invisibility in Kevin Sacco’s “Josephine”

Kevin Sacco’s Josephine (2017) is poignant and moving. Told only through sepia colored panels, without words, the semi-autobiographical¬†Josephine¬†centers on a seven year-old protagonist as he navigates Manhattan’s Upper West Side in the 1960s, guided in part by his Black caretaker, Josephine. Josephine is, as Sacco notes, a melding together “of my caretakers. . . Leonora, Cleo, Mildred, Louise, and Josephine.” Through Josephine, Sacco’s tale … Read More Josephine’s Invisibility in Kevin Sacco’s “Josephine”