Category: comics

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Reflections in Al Feldstein and Wallace Wood’s “The Guilty!”

It’s been a few years since I’ve read Al Feldstien and Wallace Wood’s “The Guilty!” in EC Comics’ Shock SuspenStories #3 from 1952. I reread the story in preparation for an upcoming class, and as I reread it, I thought, again, about the positioning of the reader throughout “The Guilty!” Today, I want to look at this story again, expanding some on what I … Read More Reflections in Al Feldstein and Wallace Wood’s “The Guilty!”

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Positioning in Al Feldstein and George Russos’ “The Slave Ship”

Getting ready to speak with some art educators this summer, I collected some EC Comics stories for us to discuss. One of those stories was Al Feldstein’s “The Slave Ship” from Weird Fantasy #8 (1951). George Russos illustrated the published version, but some Bernard Krigstein also illustrated the story. (I do not know exact dates, but you can find Krigstein’s work here, just search … Read More Positioning in Al Feldstein and George Russos’ “The Slave Ship”

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Johnnie-Ray Knox and The Hope in the Future

In the last post, I wrote about the mother and son in P. Djèlí Clark’s Ring Shout who finally see the monstrous effects of racism on an individual at the end of the novel. I taught Clark’s Ring Shout in my Multiethnic American Literature course a few weeks ago, and we followed up Clark’s novella with David Walker, Chuck Brown, and Sanford Greene’s Bitter … Read More Johnnie-Ray Knox and The Hope in the Future

Conversation with Malaka Gharib

In my Multicultural American Literature course this semester, we are reading Malaka Gharib’s graphic memoir I Was Their American Dream. As I was constructing my syllabus for the course, I was looking for graphic memoirs, and I came across Gharib’s book. I scanned a few pages on Amazon and though, “This is great.” So, I ordered it, read it, and assigned it for the course. I reached out to … Read More Conversation with Malaka Gharib

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Detecting Bullshit in Nate Powell’s “Save It For Later”

While so many aspects of Nate Powell’s Save It For Later stand out and make me stop to think, the one theme that resonates with me the most has to be the ways that our children view the world. “Their bullshit dectors,” as Powell puts in near the end of “Wingnut,” “are much better than ours.” This assertion is what drives me, partly, when … Read More Detecting Bullshit in Nate Powell’s “Save It For Later”