Category: graphic novels

Audience Positioning in Black Panther’s 1966 Debut

Recently, I’ve been interested in the narrative point of view in various texts and the ways that authors position an audience within the narrative. On one level, some African American authors like William Melvin Kelley place audiences in the perspective of whites: “The Only Man on Liberty Street,” “The Servant Problem,” and A Different Drummer. Other authors such as Ernest J. Gaines, James Baldwin, … Read More Audience Positioning in Black Panther’s 1966 Debut

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Representation and Monica Lynne’s Social Activism

Last post, I wrote about T’Challa’s role as a teacher within the community, and today I want to briefly look at Monica Lynne’s movement from an entertainer to to social activist as she begins to work as a social worker. In Avengers #73, Monica’s actions lead T’Challa to take a more active role in fighting everyday segregation and injustice within the community instead of … Read More Representation and Monica Lynne’s Social Activism

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Representation and The Black Panther as Teacher

A couple of weeks ago, I wrote about Monica Lynne’s first appearance in Avengers #73. During their first encounter, Monica Lynne causes T’Challa to see his role not just as an Avenger but as a social activist as well. Along those lines, the issues that follow, specifically Avengers #77 and #78 illuminate what T’Challa’s and Monica’s roles in the community end up being. T’Challa, … Read More Representation and The Black Panther as Teacher

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Literacy in Octavia Butler’s “Kindred”

Note:¬†For this post, I will use Duffy and Jennings’ adaptation of Butler’s Kindred. I have read Butler’s novel, but it has a been a few years. The adaptation closely follows the novel. On Tuesday, I wrote about the ways that Damian Duffy’s illustrations convey just as much emotion to the reader as Octavia Butler and John Jennings’ words in the graphic novel adaptation of … Read More Literacy in Octavia Butler’s “Kindred”

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Conveying Emotion in Duffy and Jennings’ Adaptation of Octavia Butler’s “Kindred”

One of the key aspects of reading comics and graphic novels is paying attention not just to the words but also to the visual images that accompany them. Both the words and the images work together to create an experience that, to me, resembles a melding of a printed text and movie. When I read the March trilogy and The Silence of Our Friends, … Read More Conveying Emotion in Duffy and Jennings’ Adaptation of Octavia Butler’s “Kindred”