Category: jean toomer

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I’m the Victim of America’s Sin. I’m What Sin Is.

Over the last couple of posts, I have written about Jeff Nichols’ Loving and the legal constructions of race. Today, I want to conclude that discussion by looking some at Jean Toomer’s Cane (1923) and Ernest J. Gaines’ The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman (1971). In each of these texts, published close to fifty years apart, Toomer and Gaines highlight the ways that words … Read More I’m the Victim of America’s Sin. I’m What Sin Is.

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Reflections on 2018

Note, Interminable Rambling will be on break for the next two weeks. Check back on Tuesday, January 8, 2019, for new posts. I never really know what I have accomplished, or not accomplished, until I turn my gaze backward. Over the past year, a lot has happened. I moved to Norway, with my family, for a year. I’ve traveled more in the past few … Read More Reflections on 2018

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Interracial Intimacy in Feldstein and Wood’s “Under Cover” and “The Whipping!”

If you enjoy what you read here at Interminable Rambling, think about making a contribution on our Patreon page.¬† Today, I am concluding my posts on some of Al Feldstein an Wallace Wood’s stories from EC Comics’ Shock SuspenStories¬†by looking at “Under Cover” and “The Whipping!” Both of these stories deal with the fears surrounding interracial intimacy and the ways that these fears manifested … Read More Interracial Intimacy in Feldstein and Wood’s “Under Cover” and “The Whipping!”

Interracial Relationships in Toomer’s "Bona and Paul"

Thinking about the idea of white womanhood in Toomer’s “Becky” and African American womanhood in “Blood Burning-Moon,” I commented that the concluding vignette of the Northern section, “Bona and Paul,” contains some similarities to the two Southern vignettes. “Bona and Paul” focuses on two Southerners, Paul, a phenotypically white male who tentatively starts a relationship with a white co-ed Bona. Looking at “Bona and … Read More Interracial Relationships in Toomer’s "Bona and Paul"

Representation of Womanhood in Jean Toomer’s "Becky" and "Blood-Burning Moon"

While white womanhood gets held up as a representation of the “idyllic” and “virginal” South, African American womanhood becomes something tainted and only seen as a product rather than as a human being. This image appears throughout literature fro Harriett Jacobs’s account of her life in Incidents of the Life of a Slave Girl to the way that Jimmy Caya tells Tee Bob he … Read More Representation of Womanhood in Jean Toomer’s "Becky" and "Blood-Burning Moon"