Category: photographs

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Photographs and Memory in Thi Bui’s “The Best We Could Do”: Part II

In my previous post, I started writing about photographs and constructions of memory in Thi Bui’s The Best We Could Do. Over the past year, I’ve been drawn to the ways that graphic memoirists use actual photographs within their work. Occasionally, they use actual copies of the photographs, but for the majority of the texts that I have looked at, creators reproduce the photographs, … Read More Photographs and Memory in Thi Bui’s “The Best We Could Do”: Part II

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Photographs and Memories in Thi Bui’s “The Best We Could Do”: Part I

In my last post, I looked at the role of photographs in Malaka Gharib’s I Was Their American Dream. Today, I want to continue that discussion by looking at the ways that Thi Bui depicts and deploys photographs in The Best We Could Do, a graphic memoir about her family’s escape from South Vietnam and immigration to the United States in 1970s. On the … Read More Photographs and Memories in Thi Bui’s “The Best We Could Do”: Part I

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Photographs and Memory in Malaka Gharib’s “I Was Their American Dream”

A few weeks ago, I read Malaka Gharib’s I Was Their American Dream. Gharib’s graphic memoir details coming of age as a first generation American immigrant, the daughter of a Filipino mother and Egyptian father. She explores the ways that she struggled with her identity, and the ways that she felt pulled, a lot of the time, in at least three directions in this … Read More Photographs and Memory in Malaka Gharib’s “I Was Their American Dream”

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The Foundations Under Our Feet

Driving through the North Georgia mountains a few weeks ago, I kept passing abandoned wooden buildings. At one point, I passed a newer house with a brick chimney, which appeared to be part of a previous building, in the driveway. Rolling fields and distant mountains peaks stretched behind these structures. As I drove, I recalled Kristen Radtke’s Imagine Wanting Only This and the ways … Read More The Foundations Under Our Feet

Photography in Lyle Saxon’s "Children of Strangers" and Alice Walker’s "Everyday Use"

As I reread Lyle Saxon’s Children of Strangers (1937) for the 2016 NEH Summer Institute “Ernest J. Gaines and the Southern Experience,” I couldn’t help but think about the idea of authenticity and reality when I came to the final section in the book. There, Flossie Smith, Adelaide Randolph’s friend, encounters the fallen Famie as she leaves Easter service with Henry Tyler. Upon first meeting … Read More Photography in Lyle Saxon’s "Children of Strangers" and Alice Walker’s "Everyday Use"