Tag: graphic memoir

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History, Comics, and the Civil Rights Movement

This semester, I am teaching two Civil Rights era memoirs: Lila Quintero Weaver’s Darkroom: A Memoir in Black and White and John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, and Nate Powell’s March Trilogy. I thoroughly enjoy these texts, and I enjoy teaching them. However, as I reread them, I keep thinking about what the texts don’t cover. I understand that each of these works are focused on … Read More History, Comics, and the Civil Rights Movement

Conversation with Tim Smyth about “March”

Over the course of this semester, I’ve posted conversations I’ve had with authors such as Kiku Hughes and Lila Quintero Weaver, along with scholars such as Michael Dando, Jennifer Morrison, and Eir-Anne Edgar for my Multicultural American Literature course. Today, I want to share the discussion I had with educator Tim Smyth about John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, and Nate Powell’s March: Book Two. Tim … Read More Conversation with Tim Smyth about “March”

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Professional Development Opportunity “The Civil Rights Movement in Northeast Georgia”

When I worked at the Ernest J. Gaines Center at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, one of the programs that I wanted to implement was an annual professional development opportunity for area educators, providing them a space to learn about Gaines’ work and the history and people that informed it, looking at how all of it shaped the community and region in which we lived … Read More Professional Development Opportunity “The Civil Rights Movement in Northeast Georgia”

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The Quotidian in Art Spiegelman’s “Maus”: Part II

In the previous post, I started looking at Art Spiegelman’s Maus and the ways that he focuses on individuals, not on the high ranking officials, who both perpetrated and survived the Holocaust. Along with this, Spiegelman highlights the ways that memory, especially as it relates to a traumatic event such as the Holocaust, is slippery in so many ways. I always think about George … Read More The Quotidian in Art Spiegelman’s “Maus”: Part II

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The Quotidian in Art Spiegelman’s “Maus”: Part I

Even though the study travel trip I and a colleague planned this semester for Poland will not happen, I’m continuing to read and learn more about World War II and the Holocaust specifically. Part of this process has been teaching works such as Cynthia Ozick’s The Messiah of Stockholm and Art Spiegelman’s Maus in my Multicultural American Literature course. Along with this, I have … Read More The Quotidian in Art Spiegelman’s “Maus”: Part I