Category: ibram x. kendi

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The “Visceral Feelings” of Racism in Frank Yerby’s “Griffin’s Way”

Throughout his career, Frank Yerby confronted whiteness and white supremacy in his novels. He looked at the ways that racism, xenophobia, nationalism, and oppression affected the oppressor as well as the oppressed. This is what Lillian Smith does throughout her work. It’s what Harper Lee attempts to do in To Kill a Mockingbird. It’s what Toni Morrison says we should do in Playing in … Read More The “Visceral Feelings” of Racism in Frank Yerby’s “Griffin’s Way”

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“Made in America”: History and Jeff Nichols’ “Loving”

Last Thursday, I wrote about children and home in Jeff Nichols’ Loving (2016). Today, I want to continue that conversation by focusing on one image from the film. Unfortunately, I do not have a picture of the scene because I could screen capture it. However, I will describe the pertinent parts of it below.

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Where Did These Racial Stereotypes Come From?

The Fulbright program has provided me with the opportunity to connect with scholars and students not just in Norway but across Europe as well. Recently, I had the opportunity to travel to Warsaw to speak with students about the life and work of Frank Yerby. During my presentation, I talked about some of the ways Yerby subverts and ultimately reverses stereotypes that present African … Read More Where Did These Racial Stereotypes Come From?

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Active Learning in the Literature Classroom

Over the past few semesters, I began my early American literature course with Thomas Jefferson. Starting with Jefferson’s Declaration of Independence, Notes from the State of Virginia, and letter to Benjamin Banneker was important considering the recent events in Charlottesville, VA. Typically, I start the first class with David Walker then back track to Jefferson, but after reading Ibram X. Kendi’s “What would Jefferson … Read More Active Learning in the Literature Classroom