Tag: comics

The Illusion of Whiteness in Atlanta’s “Three Slaps”

Recently, we’ve been reading and discussing Greg Anderson Elysée’s Is’Nana The Were-Spider in my “Monsters, Race, and Comics” course. Over the course of the semester so far, I have referenced “Three Slaps,” the first episode of Atlanta season 3. I’ve referred to this episode specifically because it, and the series as a whole, addresses a myriad of concepts and themes that we have been covering throughout the class. … Read More The Illusion of Whiteness in Atlanta’s “Three Slaps”

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The Importance of Stories in Greg Anderson Elysée’s “Is’Nana The Were Spider”

Every semester, I include a few texts on my syllabus that I have never read, so I get to encounter the texts for the first time alongside my students. For my “Monsters, Race, and Comics” class, someone (I apologize but I forgot who) suggested that check out Greg Anderson Elysée’s Is’Nana The Were-Spider. I read a description of the series and added it to my syllabus. IsNana … Read More The Importance of Stories in Greg Anderson Elysée’s “Is’Nana The Were Spider”

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“Racially Inflicted Language” and the Archives

In Playing in the Dark, Toni Morrison highlights the ways that language obfuscates yet also illuminates he Africanist presence at the heart of American literature. Morrison delivered the lectures that would constitute Playing in the Dark in 1990, and she foresaw possible backlash from her ideas. She chose to risk backlash because the point she sought to make was vitally important. As she puts it, “for both … Read More “Racially Inflicted Language” and the Archives

Conversation with Rodney Barnes about “Killadelphia”

For my “Monsters, Race, and Comics” class I’m teaching the first two volumes of Rodney Barnes and Jason Shawn Alexander’s Killadelphia. Recently, I spoke with Barnes about the series. We talked about the ways that the gothic works as both a “politically conservative” for and as a revolutionary form, the role that history plays within the series, the ways that the powerful weaponize fear to … Read More Conversation with Rodney Barnes about “Killadelphia”

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The Narratives of History in “Killadelphia”: Part V

Over the past few posts, I’ve been examining Jupiter Evans’ and Sally Hemings’ narrative arcs in Rodney Barnes and Jason Shawn Alexander’s Killadelphia. Specifically, I’ve been looking at the ways that the histories of Jupiter and Sally get filtered through white perspectives and the counters to the white perspective through Jupiter’s telling of his own history. We do not see Sally’s perspective directly, and we do … Read More The Narratives of History in “Killadelphia”: Part V