Tag: comics

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The Symbolic Captain America in “Truth: Red, White, and Black”

Over the past few weeks, the Crusading in Color crew has been live Tweeting our readings through Robert Morales and Kyle Baker’s Truth: Red, White, and Black. I’ve read Truth multiple times, and I’ve taught it once. Each time I reread this series, something new arises. This time, with the discussions that we had online about the series, new things started to stand out. … Read More The Symbolic Captain America in “Truth: Red, White, and Black”

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Retrieving History in Rebecca Hall and Hugo Martínez’s “Wake”

Over the last couple of posts, I’ve been looking at Rebecca Hall and Hugo Martínez’s Wake: The Hidden History of Women-Led Slave Revolts. Today, I want to conclude this series by looking at some of the panels in the last chapter of Wake. Entitled “Ancestry in Progress,” the final chapter brings together the threads that Hall and Martínez weave throughout the text, and as I have discussed previously, … Read More Retrieving History in Rebecca Hall and Hugo Martínez’s “Wake”

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The Ground Beneath Our Feet in Rebecca Hall and Hugo Martínez’s “Wake”

On a recent trip to Savannah, GA, I walked around the downtown area and visited sites such as Wormsloe, a plantation established by Noble Jones in 1736. At Wormsloe, which is a Georgia State Park, none of the materials, from the brochures to the museum to the markers around the site mentioned the enslaved who made money for Noble and his offspring. In the … Read More The Ground Beneath Our Feet in Rebecca Hall and Hugo Martínez’s “Wake”

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Book Design and Adrian Tomine’s “The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Cartoonist”

A few weeks ago, I picked up Adrian Tomine’s latest book, The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Cartoonist. I read Killing and Dying last year, and Tomine’s new book immediately caught my attention, not necessarily for the illustrations or content. No, what grabbed me was the book design itself. It’s a physically gorgeous book because it is, for all intents and purposes, a grid sketchbook. … Read More Book Design and Adrian Tomine’s “The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Cartoonist”

Severed History in Nate Powell’s “Save It For Later”: Part IV

“Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King, I Have a Dream.” This is the nine-word problem that informs much of our understanding of the Civil Rights Movement. It begins with Rosa Parks in Montgomery in 1955, carries through King during the bus boycotts and into 1963 where he delivered his famous “I Have a Dream Speech” on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial during the March on … Read More Severed History in Nate Powell’s “Save It For Later”: Part IV