Category: John Jennings

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“I do not intend to be quiet about it.”

On Wednesday, John Jennings posted one of his latest sketches on social media. The image of a tattered American flag lying on the ground as flies hovered over it with “The Untied States of America” as the caption. Jennings’ image hit me hard, especially after the racism on full display at the Presidential Debate on Tuesday night. I knew the debate was going to … Read More “I do not intend to be quiet about it.”

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False Narratives in “Profile”

Last post I wrote about Bettina Love’s “No Black Child Left Behind: Schools Policing Students of Color” and education. Today, I want to look at another piece in Bill Campbell, Jason Rodriguez, and John Ira Jennings’ APB: Artist Against Police Brutality. In “Profile,” Jennings, along with Damian Duffy and Robert Love, highlight the ways that society labels Black individuals, specifically men in this case, … Read More False Narratives in “Profile”

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Leaving Children Behind: The Policing of Black Students

Recently, I picked up a copy of APB: Artists against Police Brutality, an anthology of comics and essays edited by Bill Campbell, Jason Rodrguez, and John Ira Jennings. In the introduction to the collection, Campbell points out that the “project was borne out of anger,” specifically the anger that he felt the night that a grand jury in Staten Island decided not to put … Read More Leaving Children Behind: The Policing of Black Students

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LES Center Videos: III

In early December, I shared two posts with some of the weekly videos that I have been creating for the LES Center. Since then, I have created more videos, and I wanted to take a moment to share some of them with you today. These videos focus on talks she had with campers at Laurel Falls about racism, the ways that Smith connected her … Read More LES Center Videos: III

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Empathy in John Ira Jennings and Damian Duffy’s “Parable of the Sower”

During the camp season at Laurel Falls, Lillian Smith would write letters home to the parents of campers. In the mid-summer 1946 Laurel Leaf, she wrote to parents about the adventures of Buss Eye, the plays that the girls wrote, and other camp activities. Near the end of the letter, she writes about the conversations that the campers had after hearing about the lynching … Read More Empathy in John Ira Jennings and Damian Duffy’s “Parable of the Sower”