Category: Mark twain

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Current and Future Projects at the Lillian E. Smith Center

Over the past few weeks, I have been settling into my new position as the Director of the Lillian E. Smith Center (LES Center). During this process, I have started to read more of Smith’s work and learned more about her life and social justice work, specifically through the Laurel Falls Camp and during the Civil Rights movement. There is a lot I could … Read More Current and Future Projects at the Lillian E. Smith Center

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Why do we travel?

One of my favorite quotes comes from Mark Twain. Talking about what travel does to one’s worldview, he wrote in Innocents Abroad, “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one’s lifetime.” … Read More Why do we travel?

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Lecture for “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”

If you enjoy what you read here at Interminable Rambling, think about making a contribution on our Patreon page.  A few weeks ago, I posted about my introductory lecture for the American literature course I am teaching at the University of Bergen, and over the past few posts I have been discussing various aspects of Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884). Today, … Read More Lecture for “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”

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Illustrations in “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”

If you enjoy what you read here at Interminable Rambling, think about making a contribution on our Patreon page.  Over the past couple of posts, I’ve written about language in Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884). Today, I want to turn the attention to the paraliterary aspects of the novel, specifically E.W. Kemble’s illustrations. I have written about Kemble before, focusing on … Read More Illustrations in “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”

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“The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” and Language Part 2

If you enjoy what you read here at Interminable Rambling, think about making a contribution on our Patreon page.  Last post, I started discussing how Mark Twain uses language in The Adventures Huckleberry Finn to, as Stephen Railton notes, address “an individual’s psychological enslavement to cultural preconceptions, epistemological prejudices.” Twain achieves this in multiple ways throughout the novel, and to highlight a few of the … Read More “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” and Language Part 2