Category: marvel comics

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Volcana and Reader Fantasies in Marvel’s “Secret Wars”

Over the past couple of posts, I have focused on the depiction of women in Marvel’s crossover Secret Wars. Today, I want to wrap up that discussion by briefly looking at the relationship between Volcana (Marsha Rosenberg) and Molecule Man (Owen Reece.) As I have noted before, I could also dive into examinations of relationships between the Enchantress and Thor or between Titana and … Read More Volcana and Reader Fantasies in Marvel’s “Secret Wars”

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Zsaji and Reader Fantasies in Marvel’s “Secret Wars”

In my first post on Marvel’s Secret Wars, I discussed the ways that the representations of Janet Van Dyne and Ororo Munroe each played into both gendered and racial stereotypes. Today, I want to expand some on the ways that Secret Wars, through the some of the relationships in the series, plays into young, white male readers’ romance fantasies. This comes up in two … Read More Zsaji and Reader Fantasies in Marvel’s “Secret Wars”

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Representation in Marvel’s “Secret Wars”

A few weeks back, I picked up Marvel’s Secret Wars. This crossover event took place over the course of twelve issues from May 1984 through April 1985. I picked up Secret Wars because it looked interesting, and I remember having issue #8, the first appearance of the Symbiote, when I was younger. Fans have been clamoring for Secret Wars on the big screen, and … Read More Representation in Marvel’s “Secret Wars”

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The Same Old Same Old: Rogue and Representations of the South

Chris Claremont and Michael Golden created Rogue in 1981, and she made her debut in Avengers Annual #10. What makes Rogue interesting to me is her place of origin, the fictional Caldecott County in Mississippi. Speaking with the Clarion Ledger in 2016, Claremont told Jacob Threadgill, “I felt, why should Louisiana get all the fun? … (Mississippi) was a place where the racial divisions … Read More The Same Old Same Old: Rogue and Representations of the South

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Identity in Christopher Priest’s “Power Man and Iron Fist”

Last Thursday, I wrote about Christopher Priest’s Power Man and Iron Fist #122, looking at the ways that Priest confronts Luke Cage’s publication history. Today, I want to continue that discussion through an examination of Power Man and Iron Fist #123, an issue where Priest and co-author M.D. Bright directly address issues of race. This is the only time, apart from issue #122, where … Read More Identity in Christopher Priest’s “Power Man and Iron Fist”