Category: marvel comics

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Historical Context in “X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills”

If you enjoy what you read here at Interminable Rambling, think about making a contribution on our Patreon page.  Last post, I wrote about the rhetoric of fear that William Stryker espouses in Chris Claremont and Brent Eric Anderson’s X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills (1982) graphic novel. Today, I want to expand, some, upon that discussion and look at a couple of pivotal scenes … Read More Historical Context in “X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills”

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The Continued Importance of “X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills”

Recently, someone suggested I take a look at Chris Claremont and Brent Eric Anderson’s X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills (1982). After reading, I came away noting the number of similarities between the 36 year old graphic novel and the present moment. In an interview on the 35th anniversary of its publication, Claremont and Anderson, along with interviewer Alex Abad-Santos, talk about the correlations between … Read More The Continued Importance of “X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills”

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Celebrating Three Years! Top Five Posts and Most Viewed!

Somehow, I failed to recognise that last Thursday’s post on David F. Walker’s Luke Cage was my 300th post on Interminable Rambling. That means that this site has been live, in one form or another, for three years. A lot has happened in those three years, and I have written about a lot of subjects. Typically, I try to keep my posts around 1,000 … Read More Celebrating Three Years! Top Five Posts and Most Viewed!

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Noah Burstein, Paternalism, and Black Bodies in David F. Walker´s “Luke Cage”

After reading David Walker’s Nighthawk, I started reading his run on Luke Cage that started in May 2017. The first story arc, “Sins of  the Father,” sees Cage headed to New Orleans to attend the funeral of Dr. Noah Burstein, the man who experimented on Carl Lucas at Seagate prison, turning him into the superhero Luke Cage. Once he arrives, Cage discovers a plot … Read More Noah Burstein, Paternalism, and Black Bodies in David F. Walker´s “Luke Cage”

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We Must Listen, See, and Act: David F. Walker’s “Nighthawk”

Last post, I wrote about the ways that David F. Walker’s Nighthawk lays bare the tendrils of racism that work at various levels to suffocate and oppress people of color in America. Today, I want to expand some on this and look at how Raymond Kane confronts issues of racism and subjugation. I want to explore, briefly, the moral tensions that Kane encounters as … Read More We Must Listen, See, and Act: David F. Walker’s “Nighthawk”