Category: frank yerby

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Frank Yerby’s “White Magnolias”

On a recent trip to New Orleans, I stopped by Librairie Bookshop on Chartres and picked up four Frank Yerby paperbacks: The Saracen Blade (1952), Gillian (1960), The Man from Dahomey (1971), and A Darkness at Ingraham’s Crest (1979). Since then, I have been delving, in earnest, into Yerby’s oeuvre, one that includes thirty three novels. I’ve written about his first novel The Foxes … Read More Frank Yerby’s “White Magnolias”

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Choosing Which Texts to Teach or Not to Teach

Talking about Lyle Saxon’s Children of Strangers (1937) recently during the NEH Summer Institute, two questions arose: Why should we even read this novel? Should we even consider teaching it? Both of these questions are very important to consider when thinking about whether or not one should “expose” students to certain texts. In this post, I do not want to justify whether or not … Read More Choosing Which Texts to Teach or Not to Teach

Interracial Relationships in Toomer’s "Bona and Paul"

Thinking about the idea of white womanhood in Toomer’s “Becky” and African American womanhood in “Blood Burning-Moon,” I commented that the concluding vignette of the Northern section, “Bona and Paul,” contains some similarities to the two Southern vignettes. “Bona and Paul” focuses on two Southerners, Paul, a phenotypically white male who tentatively starts a relationship with a white co-ed Bona. Looking at “Bona and … Read More Interracial Relationships in Toomer’s "Bona and Paul"

Aunt Caleen and Subversion in Frank Yerby’s "The Foxes of Harrow"

Last post, I wrote about Inch in Frank Yerby’s The Foxes of Harrow (1946). Today, I want to take a moment to discuss Inch’s grandmother Caleen and her role in constructing and maintaining Stephen Fox’s plantation at Harrow. Even though the novel focuses on Stephen’s ascendancy in New Orleans society and his growth as a plantation owner, he could not have achieved his position … Read More Aunt Caleen and Subversion in Frank Yerby’s "The Foxes of Harrow"

Frank Yerby’s "The Foxes of Harrow" and Resistence

Original 1946 Cover Frank Yerby’s first novel The Foxes of Harrow originally appeared in 1946. After attempting to publish protest fiction, Yerby turned to historical fiction as his literary avenue. The shift catapulted him to the top of the literary charts, becoming one of the best selling African American authors of all time. Yerby published around 33 novels which sold over 55 million copies. Yerby’s … Read More Frank Yerby’s "The Foxes of Harrow" and Resistence