Category: a darkness at ingarahm’s crest

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“The Prince of Pulpsters” or “Debunker of Myths”: Frank Yerby Syllabus

When reading Frank Yerby’s work, I keep asking one question over and over again: “Why isn’t anyone teaching these texts?” I know that some scholars teach Yerby; however, compared to other authors, his appearance in the classroom is minuscule. I had heard the name, in passing, during my graduate work; however, I never saw him in any anthologies or read any of his books … Read More “The Prince of Pulpsters” or “Debunker of Myths”: Frank Yerby Syllabus

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My Five Favorite Posts from 2016

This past year, close to one hundred posts have appeared on Interminable Rambling. With the end of 2016 in our rear-view mirror, I want to take the opportunity to highlight my five favorite posts from last year. You can see my favorite posts from 2015 as well. The posts from 2016 ranged in subject matter from pop culture and music to pedagogical approaches in … Read More My Five Favorite Posts from 2016

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Frank Yerby and the Myth of White Southern Womanhood, Part 2

Over the past couple of posts, I have written about the way that Frank Yerby challenges stereotypes and the Cult of True Womanhood in The Dahomean (1971) and A Darkness at Ingraham’s Crest (1979). Today, I want to conclude this discussion by briefly highlighting the ways that Yerby constructs his African, African American, and mixed-race female characters in these two novels as counters to … Read More Frank Yerby and the Myth of White Southern Womanhood, Part 2

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Frank Yerby and the Myth of White Southern Womanhood

As mentioned in my recent post on Gillian (1960), Frank Yerby challenges the myth of Southern womanhood in his works. While I did not discuss how he does that in Gillian, I want to explore how he shatters the myth in A Darkness at Ingraham’s Crest (1979), the follow up to his 1971 book The Dahomean. While The Dahomean chronicles Hwesu’s life in Africa, … Read More Frank Yerby and the Myth of White Southern Womanhood

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Intersecting Cultures in Frank Yerby’s “The Dahomean” and “A Darkness at Ingraham’s Crest”

Frank Yerby’s The Dahomean (1971) stands, to many, as the author’s best novel. (It also goes by The Man from Dahomey. My edition has this title.) ¬†Still set in the past, like most of Yerby’s other works, The Dahomean¬†differs from his previous novels because it focuses on black characters, specifically African characters. Speak Now (1968) does center on an African American expatriate in France. … Read More Intersecting Cultures in Frank Yerby’s “The Dahomean” and “A Darkness at Ingraham’s Crest”