Tag: history

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Hitler, Nazism, Jim Crow, and the United States: Part II

Last post, I started looking at the conenctions between Nazi Germany and the Jim Crow South. Today, I want to continue that examination by looking at the post-war period. In 1951, the Civil Rights Congress presented We Charge Genocide to the United Nations. The document demonstrates how the United States violated the U.N. Genocide Convention and took part in the genocide of over 15,000,000 … Read More Hitler, Nazism, Jim Crow, and the United States: Part II

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Hitler, Nazism, Jim Crow, and the United States: Part I

In the Spring 1942-1943 issue of South Today, Lillian Smith and Paula Snelling wrote two articles: “Buying a New World with Old Confederate Bills” and “Addressed to Intelligent White Southerners: There are things to do.” Each of these articles confront the connections between the Jim Crow South, and the United States as a whole, and Nazism in Germany and the European theatre. At one … Read More Hitler, Nazism, Jim Crow, and the United States: Part I

Conversation with P. Djèlí Clark

Over the last couple of posts, I have written about the monstrosity of racism in P. Djèlí Clark’s Ring Shout and in David Walker, Chuck Brown, and Sanford Greene’s Bitter Root. Since I am teaching this texts this semester, I reached out to Clark to see if he might be available to Zoom in with my class. Unfortunately, he would not be able to … Read More Conversation with P. Djèlí Clark

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Beauty in Mansoor Adayfi “Don’t Forget Us Here”

This September marks the 20th anniversary of September 11, 2001. As well, it marks the start of the War on Terror and the start, in January 2002, of the detention of non-combatants such as Mansoor Adayfi at Guantánamo Bay. Adayfi spent fourteen years in Guantánamo. At the age of eighteen, during a cultural mission to Afghanistan, warlords picked him up, in order to claim … Read More Beauty in Mansoor Adayfi “Don’t Forget Us Here”

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History as “an open book, up under the sky”: Part II

When Charlayne Hunter and Hamilton Holmes enrolled in classes at UGA in 1961, the walked past the arch, steps away from the UGA marker that claims most of the students went to fight during “the War for Southern Independence.” Hunter and Holmes were the first African American students admitted to UGA, 7 years after Brown v. Board and 11 years after McLaurin v. Oklahoma … Read More History as “an open book, up under the sky”: Part II