Tag: history

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Lillian E. Smith and Christian Nationalism Syllabus

Each year I teach a Lillian E. Smith Studies Course, and each course, while using Smith as the center or the class, is extremely different. Since the course has a small enrollment, I let the students dictate what we will focus on in the course. One semester, the students wanted to look at mass incarceration and the legal system, so we read Michelle Alexander, … Read More Lillian E. Smith and Christian Nationalism Syllabus

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The Politics of Fear

During my Fulbright a few years ago, I went to Paris to give a talk. While there, I took a ride on the metro, and a few seats over from me I saw a woman dressed in a niqab. Fear consumed me upon seeing her, sitting in her seat as the train sped along the tracks. When the fear hit me, I immediately knew … Read More The Politics of Fear

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“Civil Rights Memoir” Syllabus

Recently, I’ve been thinking about different courses that I would want to teach in the future. In the last post, I discussed a course entitled “Literature of White Estrangement.” Today, I want to think about a course entitled “Civil Rights Memoirs.” I’ve been thinking about this course for a few weeks, and I started thinking about it because, after teaching John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, and Nate … Read More “Civil Rights Memoir” Syllabus

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The System of Whiteness in Atlanta’s “Three Slaps”: Part II

In a last post, I started looking at the system of whiteness in Atlanta’s “Three Slaps,” specifically at the ways that Loquareeous’s guidance counselor at school and the social worker who takes him away from his mother work within the system of whiteness to impact Loquareeous. Today, I want to continue with that discussion, looking a little more at Loquareeous’s “disruption” in class that sparks … Read More The System of Whiteness in Atlanta’s “Three Slaps”: Part II

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The System of Whiteness in Atlanta’s “Three Slaps”: Part I

In a recent post, I looked at the illusion of whiteness in the opening scene of Atlanta’s “Three Slaps.” I delved into how the white character on the lake talks about the inaccessibility and accessibility of whiteness, and discussed Michael Collins’ feelings of comfort in the illusion of his closeness to whiteness in Dwayne McDuffie and Denys Cowan’s Deathlok. Today, I want to continue looking at … Read More The System of Whiteness in Atlanta’s “Three Slaps”: Part I