Month: January 2019

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Buck Wild, the New Icon!

After his initial appearance in Icon #13, some fans asked whether or not Buck Wild would receive his own series. Others asked that the Milestone team update his speech and clothes to fit the 1990s. Ken Harris wrote in stating that “ICON #13 was absolutely ‘Power’-ful! NEVER has a comic make [sic] me laugh so hard. . . . it was truly comical. I … Read More Buck Wild, the New Icon!

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“There’s this old, played-out record”: Buck Wild and the History of Representation

Today, I want to continue the discussion I began in the last post on Buck Wild in Milestone Comics’ Icon. Specifically, I want to look at the ways that Dwyane McDuffie uses Buck Wild as a metonym and commentary on Black comic book characters that appeared in the 1970s. To do this, I am going to focus on Buck Wild’s initial appearance in Icon … Read More “There’s this old, played-out record”: Buck Wild and the History of Representation

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Introducing Your Tour Guide, Buck Wild

Recently, I discussed representation in Milestone Comics’ Icon. Today, I want to continue that discussion by focusing on the character of Buck Wild in the Icon series. Buck Wild originally appeared in Icon #13, and as Dwayne McDuffie has made clear, he serves as a commentary on the Black characters that appeared in mainstream comics’ during the 1970s onward. As Rebecca Wanzo notes, “By … Read More Introducing Your Tour Guide, Buck Wild

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Interracial Intimacy in Ernest Gaines’ “Bloodline”

As I read Ernest Gaines’ “Bloodline” recently, the interactions between ‘Malia and Frank Laurent stood out. The story, essentially, centers around Copper, the son of Frank’s brother Walter who raped Copper’s mother. Copper has returned to the Laurent plantation to claim what is his, by birth. Essentially, he arrives to overthrow the system that denies him an existence due to the fact that his … Read More Interracial Intimacy in Ernest Gaines’ “Bloodline”

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“African American Literature and the American West” Syllabus

The photo above is of the head of Canyon de Chelly by Timothy O’Sullivan.  For my dissertation, I explored the connections between the ways that African American, Native American, and white women authors used Scottish Enlightenment rhetoric to argue for their positions within the body politic of the United States. One of the key aspects that arose from the dissertation was the ways that African American and … Read More “African American Literature and the American West” Syllabus