Category: paul laurence dunbar

+

“African American Literature and the American West” Syllabus

The photo above is of the head of Canyon de Chelly by Timothy O’Sullivan.  For my dissertation, I explored the connections between the ways that African American, Native American, and white women authors used Scottish Enlightenment rhetoric to argue for their positions within the body politic of the United States. One of the key aspects that arose from the dissertation was the ways that African American and … Read More “African American Literature and the American West” Syllabus

+

“African American Literature and the American South” Syllabus

Occasionally, I post syllabi ideas here on the blog. Today, I want to share a syllabus I have been thinking about recently entitled “African American Literature and the American South.” The South, as a geographic and imaginary space, looms large in the works of not just African American authors but in writers of all ethnic backgrounds from the United States. Maryemma Graham discusses the … Read More “African American Literature and the American South” Syllabus

+

The Black Panther and Racial Profiling in Jungle Action #20

In preparation for the February 2018 premier of the Black Panther film, I started to delve into Don McGregor’s incarnation of Black Panther in the revived Jungle Action series from 1972-1976. The reemergence of the series, and the foregrounding of T’Challa took place in correlation with Marvel’s launching of Luke Cage, a series that looked to capitalize on the rise of Blaxploitation films during the … Read More The Black Panther and Racial Profiling in Jungle Action #20

+

Paul Laurence Dunbar’s “Nelse Hatton’s Vengeance” and the Plantation Tradition

In Tuesday’s post, I wrote about Charles Chesnutt’s “The Sheriff’s Children” and the plantation tradition. Today, I want to extend that conversation to include Paul Laurence Dunbar, an author who many have painted as an accomadationist that perpetuated African American stereotypes and played to the plantation tradition. However, as I argue elsewhere on this blog, Dunbar worked to subvert that tradition through his writing. … Read More Paul Laurence Dunbar’s “Nelse Hatton’s Vengeance” and the Plantation Tradition

+

Collaborative Project for Literature Classroom

Last semester, I had students construct presentations of terms and historical events in my Early American Literature survey course. I have a posts on the assignment itself and on some of the projects that students created. This semester, I am tweaking that assignment in a couple of ways. Rather than having students present on specific terms and presenting during the last week of class, … Read More Collaborative Project for Literature Classroom

+

What Does the Cover Say?

One topic that has always interested me is the visual representations of literary works. Visual artists from Gustave Dore and E.W. Kemble illustrated everything from Dante’s Divine Comedy (1320) to Paul Laurence Dunbar’s The Strength of Gideon and Other Stories (1900). Thinking about these visual representations along with the text provides an interesting conversation, not just regarding how the images and texts interact but how … Read More What Does the Cover Say?

"Charles W. Chesnutt and The Race Question at the Turn of the TwentiethCentury" Syllabus

Recently, I just finished reading Charles W. Chesnutt’s “The Future American” (1900) and The Quarry (1928) for a paper I am writing. As I read Chesnutt’s last novel, I started to think about a possible syllabus that would use Chesnutt as a focal point to explore “the race question” at the turn of the twentieth century. I have posted syllabi such as “African American Crime … Read More "Charles W. Chesnutt and The Race Question at the Turn of the TwentiethCentury" Syllabus

Some Thoughts about Amelia E. Johnson’s "Clarence and Corinne; or, God’s Way"

Recently, I wrote about Paul Laurence Dunbar’s The Love of Landry (1900), a novel that focuses on white characters and the frontier. Along those same lines, I want to briefly discuss another novel from the late nineteenth century by an African American author that focuses on non-racialized characters. Amelia Johnson’s Clarence and Corinne; or, God’s Way (1890) originally appeared as a religious tract published … Read More Some Thoughts about Amelia E. Johnson’s "Clarence and Corinne; or, God’s Way"

+

Paul Laurence Dunbar’s "The Love of Landry" and Civilization

Recently, while preparing for the 2016 College Language Association Conference, I went back and looked at more of Paul Laurence Dunbar’s writings. I examined some of his newspaper articles, short stories, and The Love of Landry (1900). During his career, Dunbar wrote four novels, and three of them focused on white, not African American, characters. The Love of Landry was Dunbar’s second novel, and … Read More Paul Laurence Dunbar’s "The Love of Landry" and Civilization

Top Five Books of 2015!

On Tuesday, I listed my top five posts from 2015. Today, I want to take the opportunity to share with you the to five books I read/reread this previous year. Again, this list is in no particular order. As with most lists, this one was hard to compile, especially considering all of the books I read this year from Frank Yerby’s Speak Now to John A. … Read More Top Five Books of 2015!

Mark Twain’s "The War Prayer" & #JeSuisParis

#prayfortheworld, Leemarej, ink on paper, 2015 Scrolling through my Facebook feed a couple of days after the events in Paris, I came across a post that referenced Mark Twain’s “The War Prayer.”  Twain’s story, published posthumously in 1923, takes place in an unnamed country preparing for war. Community members, filled with patriotism, gathered at the local church before the soldiers (volunteers) departed for the … Read More Mark Twain’s "The War Prayer" & #JeSuisParis

Henry J. Lewis’s "The Great Southern Exodus"

Last post, I provided a syllabus for a class on migration narratives in African American literature. Today, I want to take a look at a cartoon by Henry J. Lewis that appeared in the Indianapolis Freeman in 1889. The Great Southern Exodus contains four frames that depict the migration of African Americans away from the South during the latter part of the nineteenth century. … Read More Henry J. Lewis’s "The Great Southern Exodus"